Revolutions without enemies

Key transformations in political science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

American political science is a congenitally unsettled discipline, witnessing a number of movements designed to reorient its fundamental character. Four prominent movements are compared here: the statism accompanying the discipline's early professionalization, the pluralism of the late 1910s and early 1920s, behavioralism, and the Caucus for a New Political Science (with a brief glance at the more recent Perestroika). Of these movements, only the first and third clearly succeeded. The discipline has proven very hard to shift. Despite the rhetoric that accompanied behavioralism, both it and statism were revolutions without enemies within the discipline (other than those appearing after they succeeded), and therein lies the key to their success.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-492
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Political Science Review
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

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political science
Perestroika
professionalization
pluralism
rhetoric

Cite this

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Revolutions without enemies : Key transformations in political science. / Dryzek, John S.

In: American Political Science Review, Vol. 100, No. 4, 11.2006, p. 487-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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