Rural and regional mental health

Rhonda WILSON (Editor)

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

This chapter begins with an overview of the rural and regional clinical context, and explores the connections that rural mental health clinicians have within rural communities. Some models of mental health promotion and service delivery are discussed, such as community based services, visiting services, bed-based services, and e-mental health services. The nature of life in rural settings and the ways in which climate and geographical location effects the mental health of people are also considered in the context of mental health resilience and vulnerability. Attention is given to the effects of natural disaster, agribusiness, mining, itinerant rural workforce and under-employment, and the mental health consequences related to these matters. In addition, the story of a newly graduated registered nurse's experience in a rural hospital illustrates the real-life tensions between resourcing and helping rural people with mental illness. This chapter discusses some rural community benefits in regard to mental health promotion, such as a deeply felt sense of close social proximity despite significant geographical distances between rural people, and it explores aspects of rural stoicism. Rural and regional mental health promotion are considered and linked to key groups such as young people, and the agricultural and mining sectors. After reading this chapter, students will be able to reflect on, and critically think about, the ways in which mental health promotion, well-being and recovery can be enhances among rural populations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMental Health
Subtitle of host publicationA Person-Centred Approach
EditorsNicholas Procter, Helen Hamer, Denise McGarry, Rhonda Wilson, Terry Froggatt
Place of PublicationNew York, United States of America
PublisherCambridge University Press
Chapter13
Pages287-310
Number of pages24
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781139699570
ISBN (Print)9781107667723
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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mental health
health promotion
rural community
health service
underemployment
health consequences
rural population
mental illness
resilience
natural disaster
vulnerability
nurse
well-being
climate
community
experience
Group
student

Cite this

WILSON, R. (Ed.) (2014). Rural and regional mental health. In N. Procter, H. Hamer, D. McGarry, R. Wilson, & T. Froggatt (Eds.), Mental Health: A Person-Centred Approach (1 ed., pp. 287-310). New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press.
WILSON, Rhonda (Editor). / Rural and regional mental health. Mental Health: A Person-Centred Approach. editor / Nicholas Procter ; Helen Hamer ; Denise McGarry ; Rhonda Wilson ; Terry Froggatt. 1. ed. New York, United States of America : Cambridge University Press, 2014. pp. 287-310
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WILSON, R (ed.) 2014, Rural and regional mental health. in N Procter, H Hamer, D McGarry, R Wilson & T Froggatt (eds), Mental Health: A Person-Centred Approach. 1 edn, Cambridge University Press, New York, United States of America, pp. 287-310.

Rural and regional mental health. / WILSON, Rhonda (Editor).

Mental Health: A Person-Centred Approach. ed. / Nicholas Procter; Helen Hamer; Denise McGarry; Rhonda Wilson; Terry Froggatt. 1. ed. New York, United States of America : Cambridge University Press, 2014. p. 287-310.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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WILSON R, (ed.). Rural and regional mental health. In Procter N, Hamer H, McGarry D, Wilson R, Froggatt T, editors, Mental Health: A Person-Centred Approach. 1 ed. New York, United States of America: Cambridge University Press. 2014. p. 287-310