Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City?

Cameron Gordon

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    In 1898, the five counties of Richmond, New York, Bronx, Queens, and Kings came together in a consolidation which created the five boroughs of New York City. Staten Island went from being an independent county in the State of New York to a interdependent borough of the new City of New York, as did the other counties. The consolidation offered a lot of promises, and a lot of promises were made to get it to happen. Which raises a basic question: has this merger resulted in more efficient provision of public services and greater economic returns than would have been the case had the five counties remained independent entities? From an equity perspective, what have the residents of the outer boroughs gained and what have they lost, especially in relation to Manhattan? This paper reviews some very preliminary data assessing the efficiency and equity gains and losses of the largest municipal consolidation in American history. The existing literature on public choice, optimal public scale and fiscal federalism is examined to provide a framework for the initial findings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists
    EditorsJamie Doughney, Tran Van Hoa
    Place of PublicationMelbourne
    PublisherAustralian Conference of Economists
    Pages1-19
    Number of pages19
    ISBN (Print)9781862726956
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    EventACE 2012, The 41st Annual Conference of Economists - Melbourne, Australia
    Duration: 8 Jul 201212 Jul 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceACE 2012, The 41st Annual Conference of Economists
    CountryAustralia
    CityMelbourne
    Period8/07/1212/07/12

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    consolidation
    public service
    equity
    efficiency
    public choice
    merger
    federalism
    resident
    history
    economics
    literature

    Cite this

    Gordon, C. (2012). Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City? In J. Doughney, & T. V. Hoa (Eds.), The Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists (pp. 1-19). Melbourne: Australian Conference of Economists.
    Gordon, Cameron. / Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City?. The Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists. editor / Jamie Doughney ; Tran Van Hoa. Melbourne : Australian Conference of Economists, 2012. pp. 1-19
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    abstract = "In 1898, the five counties of Richmond, New York, Bronx, Queens, and Kings came together in a consolidation which created the five boroughs of New York City. Staten Island went from being an independent county in the State of New York to a interdependent borough of the new City of New York, as did the other counties. The consolidation offered a lot of promises, and a lot of promises were made to get it to happen. Which raises a basic question: has this merger resulted in more efficient provision of public services and greater economic returns than would have been the case had the five counties remained independent entities? From an equity perspective, what have the residents of the outer boroughs gained and what have they lost, especially in relation to Manhattan? This paper reviews some very preliminary data assessing the efficiency and equity gains and losses of the largest municipal consolidation in American history. The existing literature on public choice, optimal public scale and fiscal federalism is examined to provide a framework for the initial findings.",
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    Gordon, C 2012, Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City? in J Doughney & TV Hoa (eds), The Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists. Australian Conference of Economists, Melbourne, pp. 1-19, ACE 2012, The 41st Annual Conference of Economists, Melbourne, Australia, 8/07/12.

    Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City? / Gordon, Cameron.

    The Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists. ed. / Jamie Doughney; Tran Van Hoa. Melbourne : Australian Conference of Economists, 2012. p. 1-19.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    Gordon C. Scale, Scope, Efficiency and Equity in Public Service Provision: How might we analyse the 1898 Consolidation of New York City? In Doughney J, Hoa TV, editors, The Future of Economics: Research, Policy and Relevance : Proceedings of the 41st Australian Conference of Economists. Melbourne: Australian Conference of Economists. 2012. p. 1-19