Segregation, nestedness and homogenisation in plant communities dominated by native and alien species

Federico Tomasetto, Richard P. Duncan, Philip E. Hulme, Susan K. Wiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Highly modified landscapes offer the opportunity to assess how environmental factors influence the integration of alien plant species into native vegetation communities and determine the vulnerability of different communities to invasion. Aims: To examine the importance of biotic and abiotic drivers in determining whether alien plant species segregate spatially from native plant communities or become integrated and lead to biotic homogenisation. Methods: Ordination and classification of a floristic survey of over 1200 systematically located 6 m × 6 m plots were used to examine how plant community segregation, nestedness and homogenisation varied in relation to climate, environmental and human-related factors across Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. Results: The analyses of community structure indicated that native and alien plant communities were spatially and ecologically segregated due to different responses primarily to an anthropogenic impact gradient and secondly to environmental factors along an elevation gradient. Human-land use appeared most strongly linked to the distribution of alien species and was associated with increased vegetation homogenisation. However, despite spatial segregation of alien and native plant communities, biotic homogenisation not only occurred in highly managed grasslands but also in relatively less managed shrublands and forest. Conclusions: The role played by anthropogenic factors in shaping alien and native plant species community structure should not be ignored and, even along a marked environmental gradient, if the recipient sites have a long history of human-related disturbance, biotic homogenisation is often strong.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-488
Number of pages10
JournalPlant Ecology and Diversity
Volume11
Issue number4
Early online date21 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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nestedness
homogenization
introduced species
native species
plant community
plant communities
indigenous species
introduced plants
community structure
environmental factor
vegetation
shrubland
environmental gradient
environmental factors
ordination
floristics
vulnerability
shrublands
grassland
anthropogenic activities

Cite this

Tomasetto, Federico ; Duncan, Richard P. ; Hulme, Philip E. ; Wiser, Susan K. / Segregation, nestedness and homogenisation in plant communities dominated by native and alien species. In: Plant Ecology and Diversity. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 479-488.
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Segregation, nestedness and homogenisation in plant communities dominated by native and alien species. / Tomasetto, Federico; Duncan, Richard P.; Hulme, Philip E.; Wiser, Susan K.

In: Plant Ecology and Diversity, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2018, p. 479-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Segregation, nestedness and homogenisation in plant communities dominated by native and alien species

AU - Tomasetto, Federico

AU - Duncan, Richard P.

AU - Hulme, Philip E.

AU - Wiser, Susan K.

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