Self-esteem

Phillip S. Kavanagh, Hayley E. Scrutton

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

Evolutionary psychology provides a comprehensive framework for conceptualizing the cognitive and affective mechanisms that humans possess, one of which is self-esteem. Sociometer theory is arguably one of the leading theories of self-esteem from an evolutionary psychology perspective. The current chapter reviews the evidence for sociometer theory within the context of the core premises of evolutionary psychology in an attempt to understand the role and function of self-esteem. Although there is mounting support for this theory, there are still areas that require further investigation, such as the number of sociometers that exist and the domain-specific versus domain-general nature of these gauges of social inclusion.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEvolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology
EditorsVirgil Zeigler-Hill, Lisa Welling, Todd Shackelford
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherSpringer
Chapter10
Pages127-136
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9783319126975
ISBN (Print)9783319126968
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameEvolutionary Psychology
ISSN (Print)2197-9898
ISSN (Electronic)2197-9901

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Self Concept
Psychology

Cite this

Kavanagh, P. S., & Scrutton, H. E. (2015). Self-esteem. In V. Zeigler-Hill, L. Welling, & T. Shackelford (Eds.), Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology (pp. 127-136). (Evolutionary Psychology). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12697-5_10
Kavanagh, Phillip S. ; Scrutton, Hayley E. / Self-esteem. Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology. editor / Virgil Zeigler-Hill ; Lisa Welling ; Todd Shackelford. Cham, Switzerland : Springer, 2015. pp. 127-136 (Evolutionary Psychology).
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Kavanagh, PS & Scrutton, HE 2015, Self-esteem. in V Zeigler-Hill, L Welling & T Shackelford (eds), Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology. Evolutionary Psychology, Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 127-136. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12697-5_10

Self-esteem. / Kavanagh, Phillip S.; Scrutton, Hayley E.

Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology. ed. / Virgil Zeigler-Hill; Lisa Welling; Todd Shackelford. Cham, Switzerland : Springer, 2015. p. 127-136 (Evolutionary Psychology).

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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Kavanagh PS, Scrutton HE. Self-esteem. In Zeigler-Hill V, Welling L, Shackelford T, editors, Evolutionary Perspectives on Social Psychology. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. 2015. p. 127-136. (Evolutionary Psychology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12697-5_10