Self-paced exercise in hot and cool conditions is associated with the maintenance of %VO2peak within a narrow range

Julien D. Périard, Sébastien Racinais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the time course and extent of decrease in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) during self-paced exercise in HOT (35°C and 60% relative humidity) and COOL (18°C and 40% relative humidity) laboratory conditions. Ten well-trained cyclists completed four consecutive 16.5-min time trials (15-min self-paced effort with 1.5-min maximal end-spurt to determine VO2peak) interspersed by 5 min of recovery on a cycle ergometer in each condition. Rectal temperature increased significantly more in HOT (39.4 ± 0.7°C) than COOL (38.6 ± 0.3°C; P < 0.001). Power output was lower throughout HOT compared with COOL (P < 0.001). The decrease in power output from trial 1 to 4 was ∼16% greater in HOT (P < 0.001). Oxygen uptake (VO2) was lower throughout HOT than COOL (P < 0.05), except at 5 min and during the end-spurt in trial 1. In HOT, VO2peak reached 97, 89, 85, and 85% of predetermined maximal VO2, whereas in COOL 97, 94, 93, and 92% were attained. Relative exercise intensity (%VO2peak ) during trials 1 and 2 was lower in HOT (∼84%) than COOL (∼86%; P < 0.05), decreasing slightly during trials 3 and 4 (∼80 and ∼85%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, heart rate was higher throughout HOT (P = 0.002), and ratings of perceived exertion greater during trials 3 and 4 in HOT (P < 0.05). Consequently, the regulation of self-paced exercise appears to occur in conjunction with the maintenance of %VO2peak within a narrow range (80-85% VO2peak). This range widens under heat stress, however, when exercise becomes protracted and a disassociation develops between relative exercise intensity, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1258-1265
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume118
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Humidity
Heart Rate
Maintenance
Oxygen
Hot Temperature
Temperature

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title = "Self-paced exercise in hot and cool conditions is associated with the maintenance of {\%}VO2peak within a narrow range",
abstract = "This study examined the time course and extent of decrease in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) during self-paced exercise in HOT (35°C and 60{\%} relative humidity) and COOL (18°C and 40{\%} relative humidity) laboratory conditions. Ten well-trained cyclists completed four consecutive 16.5-min time trials (15-min self-paced effort with 1.5-min maximal end-spurt to determine VO2peak) interspersed by 5 min of recovery on a cycle ergometer in each condition. Rectal temperature increased significantly more in HOT (39.4 ± 0.7°C) than COOL (38.6 ± 0.3°C; P < 0.001). Power output was lower throughout HOT compared with COOL (P < 0.001). The decrease in power output from trial 1 to 4 was ∼16{\%} greater in HOT (P < 0.001). Oxygen uptake (VO2) was lower throughout HOT than COOL (P < 0.05), except at 5 min and during the end-spurt in trial 1. In HOT, VO2peak reached 97, 89, 85, and 85{\%} of predetermined maximal VO2, whereas in COOL 97, 94, 93, and 92{\%} were attained. Relative exercise intensity ({\%}VO2peak ) during trials 1 and 2 was lower in HOT (∼84{\%}) than COOL (∼86{\%}; P < 0.05), decreasing slightly during trials 3 and 4 (∼80 and ∼85{\%}, respectively; P < 0.05). However, heart rate was higher throughout HOT (P = 0.002), and ratings of perceived exertion greater during trials 3 and 4 in HOT (P < 0.05). Consequently, the regulation of self-paced exercise appears to occur in conjunction with the maintenance of {\%}VO2peak within a narrow range (80-85{\%} VO2peak). This range widens under heat stress, however, when exercise becomes protracted and a disassociation develops between relative exercise intensity, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion.",
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Self-paced exercise in hot and cool conditions is associated with the maintenance of %VO2peak within a narrow range. / Périard, Julien D.; Racinais, Sébastien.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 118, No. 10, 15.05.2015, p. 1258-1265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Self-paced exercise in hot and cool conditions is associated with the maintenance of %VO2peak within a narrow range

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AU - Racinais, Sébastien

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AB - This study examined the time course and extent of decrease in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) during self-paced exercise in HOT (35°C and 60% relative humidity) and COOL (18°C and 40% relative humidity) laboratory conditions. Ten well-trained cyclists completed four consecutive 16.5-min time trials (15-min self-paced effort with 1.5-min maximal end-spurt to determine VO2peak) interspersed by 5 min of recovery on a cycle ergometer in each condition. Rectal temperature increased significantly more in HOT (39.4 ± 0.7°C) than COOL (38.6 ± 0.3°C; P < 0.001). Power output was lower throughout HOT compared with COOL (P < 0.001). The decrease in power output from trial 1 to 4 was ∼16% greater in HOT (P < 0.001). Oxygen uptake (VO2) was lower throughout HOT than COOL (P < 0.05), except at 5 min and during the end-spurt in trial 1. In HOT, VO2peak reached 97, 89, 85, and 85% of predetermined maximal VO2, whereas in COOL 97, 94, 93, and 92% were attained. Relative exercise intensity (%VO2peak ) during trials 1 and 2 was lower in HOT (∼84%) than COOL (∼86%; P < 0.05), decreasing slightly during trials 3 and 4 (∼80 and ∼85%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, heart rate was higher throughout HOT (P = 0.002), and ratings of perceived exertion greater during trials 3 and 4 in HOT (P < 0.05). Consequently, the regulation of self-paced exercise appears to occur in conjunction with the maintenance of %VO2peak within a narrow range (80-85% VO2peak). This range widens under heat stress, however, when exercise becomes protracted and a disassociation develops between relative exercise intensity, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion.

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