Self-tracking Cultures: Towards a Sociology of Personal Informatics

Deborah Lupton

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contributionpeer-review

    198 Citations (Scopus)
    607 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    A body of literature on self-tracking has been established in human-computer interaction studies. Contributors to this literature tend to take a cognitive or behavioural psychology approach to theorising and explaining selftracking. Such an approach is limited to understanding individual behaviour. Yet self-tracking is a profoundly social practice, both in terms of the enculturated meanings with which it is invested and the social encounters and social institutions that are part of the selftracking phenomenon. In this paper I contend that sociological perspectives can contribute some intriguing possibilities for human-computer interaction research, particularly in developing an understanding of the wider social, cultural and political dimensions of what I refer to as 'self-tracking cultures'. The discussion focuses on the following topics: self-optimisation and governing the self; entanglements of bodies and technologies; the valorisation of data; data doubles; and social inequalities and self-tracking. The paper ends with outlining some directions for future research on self-tracking cultures that goes beyond the individual to the social.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014
    EditorsToni Robertson, Kenton O'Hara, Greg Wadley, Lian Loke, Tuck Leong
    Place of PublicationNew York, USA
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Pages77-86
    Number of pages10
    ISBN (Print)9781450306539
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Designing Futures: the Future of Design - Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 2 Dec 20145 Dec 2014

    Publication series

    NameProceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014

    Conference

    Conference26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Designing Futures: the Future of Design
    Country/TerritoryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period2/12/145/12/14

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