Skeletal muscle strength and endurance are maintained during moderate dehydration

J D Périard, A H Tammam, M. W. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of moderate dehydration (~2.5% body weight) on muscle strength and endurance using percutaneous electrical stimulation to quantify central and peripheral fatigue, and isolate the combined effects of exercise-heat stress and dehydration, vs. the effect of dehydration alone. Force production and voluntary activation were calculated in 10 males during 1 brief and 15 repeated maximal voluntary isometric contractions performed prior to (control) walking in the heat (35°C), immediately following exercise, and the next morning (dehydration). The protocol was also performed in a euhydrated state. During the brief contractions, force production and voluntary activation were maintained in all trials. In contrast, force production decreased throughout the repeated contractions, regardless of hydration status (P<0.001). The decline in force was greater immediately following exercise-heat stress dehydration compared with control and euhydration (P<0.001). When dehydration was isolated from acute post-exercise dehydration, force production was maintained similarly to control and euhydration. Despite the progressive decline in force production and the increased fatigability observed during the repeated contractions, voluntary activation remained elevated throughout each muscle function test. Therefore, moderate dehydration, isolated from acute exercise-heat stress, does not appear to influence strength during a single contraction or enhance fatigability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)607-12
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Muscle Strength
Dehydration
Skeletal Muscle
Hot Temperature
Exercise
Isometric Contraction
Electric Stimulation
Walking
Fatigue
Body Weight
Muscles

Cite this

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title = "Skeletal muscle strength and endurance are maintained during moderate dehydration",
abstract = "This study investigated the effects of moderate dehydration (~2.5{\%} body weight) on muscle strength and endurance using percutaneous electrical stimulation to quantify central and peripheral fatigue, and isolate the combined effects of exercise-heat stress and dehydration, vs. the effect of dehydration alone. Force production and voluntary activation were calculated in 10 males during 1 brief and 15 repeated maximal voluntary isometric contractions performed prior to (control) walking in the heat (35°C), immediately following exercise, and the next morning (dehydration). The protocol was also performed in a euhydrated state. During the brief contractions, force production and voluntary activation were maintained in all trials. In contrast, force production decreased throughout the repeated contractions, regardless of hydration status (P<0.001). The decline in force was greater immediately following exercise-heat stress dehydration compared with control and euhydration (P<0.001). When dehydration was isolated from acute post-exercise dehydration, force production was maintained similarly to control and euhydration. Despite the progressive decline in force production and the increased fatigability observed during the repeated contractions, voluntary activation remained elevated throughout each muscle function test. Therefore, moderate dehydration, isolated from acute exercise-heat stress, does not appear to influence strength during a single contraction or enhance fatigability.",
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Skeletal muscle strength and endurance are maintained during moderate dehydration. / Périard, J D; Tammam, A H; Thompson, M. W.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 607-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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