Snowsport experience, expertise, lower limb injury and somatosensory ability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Previous research demonstrates that a history of ankle injuries increases the risk of overall future injuries, and that somatosensory scores are correlated to sport performance. This research explores the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores in snowsport participants and ankle injury history; and the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores and Instructor qualification. Design and Methods: Experienced snowsport participants who were recruited through a western Canadian snowsport school completed a questionnaire that included their ankle injury history, the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability (idFAI), the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT), and their current instructor qualification level, as a proxy for sport performance. Lower limb somatosensory was assessed using the active movement extent discrimination assessment (AMEDA) method. Results: Of the 75 participants, 55% reported at least one previous ankle injury. An independent sample t-test did not show any significant difference in somatosensory scores of those with an ankle injury history (x¯ =.66, SD =.05) or not (x¯ =.66, SD =.05). Nor was there any difference between those with a functionally unstable ankle (i.e. CAIT < 24 and idFAI > 11) and all others [x¯ =.66, SD =.04 cf. x¯ =.66, SD =.05; t(67) =.54, p =.78]. An ANOVA exploring the relationship between Instructor Qualification and somatosensory scores was significant at p <.05 [F(4, 68) = 4.0, p =.006]. Conclusions: The results did not reveal any significant difference in perceived functional instability and somatosensory scores, which contrasts with previous research. The sport performance finding is consistent with previous work examining the relationship between somatosensory scores and sport performances. Further research is needed to explore if the dynamic snowsport working environment impacts ankle instability and somatosensory scores.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jan 2018

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Ankle Injuries
Athletic Performance
Ankle
Lower Extremity
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Proxy
Analysis of Variance

Cite this

@article{baf013f5fece43e6bc9479136b1df80d,
title = "Snowsport experience, expertise, lower limb injury and somatosensory ability",
abstract = "Objectives: Previous research demonstrates that a history of ankle injuries increases the risk of overall future injuries, and that somatosensory scores are correlated to sport performance. This research explores the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores in snowsport participants and ankle injury history; and the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores and Instructor qualification. Design and Methods: Experienced snowsport participants who were recruited through a western Canadian snowsport school completed a questionnaire that included their ankle injury history, the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability (idFAI), the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT), and their current instructor qualification level, as a proxy for sport performance. Lower limb somatosensory was assessed using the active movement extent discrimination assessment (AMEDA) method. Results: Of the 75 participants, 55{\%} reported at least one previous ankle injury. An independent sample t-test did not show any significant difference in somatosensory scores of those with an ankle injury history (x¯ =.66, SD =.05) or not (x¯ =.66, SD =.05). Nor was there any difference between those with a functionally unstable ankle (i.e. CAIT < 24 and idFAI > 11) and all others [x¯ =.66, SD =.04 cf. x¯ =.66, SD =.05; t(67) =.54, p =.78]. An ANOVA exploring the relationship between Instructor Qualification and somatosensory scores was significant at p <.05 [F(4, 68) = 4.0, p =.006]. Conclusions: The results did not reveal any significant difference in perceived functional instability and somatosensory scores, which contrasts with previous research. The sport performance finding is consistent with previous work examining the relationship between somatosensory scores and sport performances. Further research is needed to explore if the dynamic snowsport working environment impacts ankle instability and somatosensory scores.",
keywords = "Skiing, Snowboarding, Somatosensory ability",
author = "Dickson, {Tracey J.} and Gordon Waddington and Terwiel, {F. Anne}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2018.08.005",
language = "English",
journal = "Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Snowsport experience, expertise, lower limb injury and somatosensory ability

AU - Dickson, Tracey J.

AU - Waddington, Gordon

AU - Terwiel, F. Anne

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objectives: Previous research demonstrates that a history of ankle injuries increases the risk of overall future injuries, and that somatosensory scores are correlated to sport performance. This research explores the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores in snowsport participants and ankle injury history; and the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores and Instructor qualification. Design and Methods: Experienced snowsport participants who were recruited through a western Canadian snowsport school completed a questionnaire that included their ankle injury history, the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability (idFAI), the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT), and their current instructor qualification level, as a proxy for sport performance. Lower limb somatosensory was assessed using the active movement extent discrimination assessment (AMEDA) method. Results: Of the 75 participants, 55% reported at least one previous ankle injury. An independent sample t-test did not show any significant difference in somatosensory scores of those with an ankle injury history (x¯ =.66, SD =.05) or not (x¯ =.66, SD =.05). Nor was there any difference between those with a functionally unstable ankle (i.e. CAIT < 24 and idFAI > 11) and all others [x¯ =.66, SD =.04 cf. x¯ =.66, SD =.05; t(67) =.54, p =.78]. An ANOVA exploring the relationship between Instructor Qualification and somatosensory scores was significant at p <.05 [F(4, 68) = 4.0, p =.006]. Conclusions: The results did not reveal any significant difference in perceived functional instability and somatosensory scores, which contrasts with previous research. The sport performance finding is consistent with previous work examining the relationship between somatosensory scores and sport performances. Further research is needed to explore if the dynamic snowsport working environment impacts ankle instability and somatosensory scores.

AB - Objectives: Previous research demonstrates that a history of ankle injuries increases the risk of overall future injuries, and that somatosensory scores are correlated to sport performance. This research explores the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores in snowsport participants and ankle injury history; and the relationship between lower limb somatosensory scores and Instructor qualification. Design and Methods: Experienced snowsport participants who were recruited through a western Canadian snowsport school completed a questionnaire that included their ankle injury history, the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability (idFAI), the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT), and their current instructor qualification level, as a proxy for sport performance. Lower limb somatosensory was assessed using the active movement extent discrimination assessment (AMEDA) method. Results: Of the 75 participants, 55% reported at least one previous ankle injury. An independent sample t-test did not show any significant difference in somatosensory scores of those with an ankle injury history (x¯ =.66, SD =.05) or not (x¯ =.66, SD =.05). Nor was there any difference between those with a functionally unstable ankle (i.e. CAIT < 24 and idFAI > 11) and all others [x¯ =.66, SD =.04 cf. x¯ =.66, SD =.05; t(67) =.54, p =.78]. An ANOVA exploring the relationship between Instructor Qualification and somatosensory scores was significant at p <.05 [F(4, 68) = 4.0, p =.006]. Conclusions: The results did not reveal any significant difference in perceived functional instability and somatosensory scores, which contrasts with previous research. The sport performance finding is consistent with previous work examining the relationship between somatosensory scores and sport performances. Further research is needed to explore if the dynamic snowsport working environment impacts ankle instability and somatosensory scores.

KW - Skiing

KW - Snowboarding

KW - Somatosensory ability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052137953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/snowsport-experience-expertise-lower-limb-injury-somatosensory-ability

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2018.08.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2018.08.005

M3 - Article

JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

ER -