Social Capital and the Networking Practices of Indigenous Entrepreneurs

Dennis FOLEY, Allan O’Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A comparative case study analysis has been undertaken on Australian Aboriginal, native Hawaiians, and Ma¯ori entrepreneurs. This work investigates the networking activities by these groups of indigenous entrepreneurs situated within a mixed minority (indigenous) and dominant (settler majority) urban cultural setting. The way in which indigenous entrepreneurs network to achieve their business aspirations suggests that the underlying social capital dimensions are unique to their cultural context. Five comparative characteristics also emerged from the data that assist the analysis. The research reveals how indigenous and potentially other minority ethnic entrepreneurs draw upon internal and external network ties that are related to the historical and cultural influence on social capital.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)276-296
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Small Business Management
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Industry
Social capital
Entrepreneurs
Networking
Cultural influences
Cultural context
Minorities
Aspiration
Ethnic minorities
Comparative case study

Cite this

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Social Capital and the Networking Practices of Indigenous Entrepreneurs. / FOLEY, Dennis; O’Connor, Allan.

In: Journal of Small Business Management, Vol. 51, No. 2, 2013, p. 276-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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