Social interactions receive priority to conscious perception

Junzhu Su, Jeroen J.A. Van Boxtel, Hongjing Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Humans are social animals, constantly engaged with other people. The importance of social thought and action is hard to overstate. However, is social information so important that it actually determines which stimuli are promoted to conscious experience and which stimuli are suppressed as invisible? To address this question, we used a binocular rivalry paradigm, in which the two eyes receive different action stimuli. In two experiments we measured the conscious percept of rival actions and found that actions engaged in social interactions are granted preferential access to visual awareness over non-interactive actions. Lastly, an attentional task that presumably engaged the mentalizing system enhanced the priority assigned to social interactions in reaching conscious perception. We also found a positive correlation between human identification of interactive activity and the promotion of socially-relevant information to visual awareness. The present findings suggest that the visual system amplifies socially-relevant sensory information and actively promotes it to consciousness, thereby facilitating inferences about social interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0160468
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Binoculars
Interpersonal Relations
Animals
Theory of Mind
Forensic Anthropology
Experiments
consciousness
Consciousness
eyes
animals

Cite this

Su, Junzhu ; Van Boxtel, Jeroen J.A. ; Lu, Hongjing. / Social interactions receive priority to conscious perception. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 8. pp. 1-17.
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Social interactions receive priority to conscious perception. / Su, Junzhu; Van Boxtel, Jeroen J.A.; Lu, Hongjing.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 8, e0160468, 01.08.2016, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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