Social Media Sentiment Analysis: A New Empirical Tool for Assessing Public Opinion on Crime?

Jeremy Prichard, Paul Watters, Tony KRONE, Caroline Spiranovic, HELEN COCKBURN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

'Big data' presents many interesting opportunities and challenges. This article focuses on the potential use of social media sentiment analysis as a legitimate tool for criminological research to better understand public perceptions of crime problems and public attitudes to responses to crime. While a degree of scepticism should always apply to the use of unsubstantiated sources on the internet, SMSA is likely to be a rich source of valuable information. Observational SMSA research presents low-level risks in terms of human research ethics principally because the information derived is unlikely to lead to the identification of research subjects. It is arguable, but less certain, that material posted publicly online does not attract a reasonable expectation of privacy for the author. However, the strength of this argument may depend on the particular circumstances in which the material to be analysed was posted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-236
Number of pages20
JournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justice
Volume27
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Prichard, Jeremy ; Watters, Paul ; KRONE, Tony ; Spiranovic, Caroline ; COCKBURN, HELEN. / Social Media Sentiment Analysis: A New Empirical Tool for Assessing Public Opinion on Crime?. In: Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 2015 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 217-236.
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Prichard, J, Watters, P, KRONE, T, Spiranovic, C & COCKBURN, HELEN 2015, 'Social Media Sentiment Analysis: A New Empirical Tool for Assessing Public Opinion on Crime?', Current Issues in Criminal Justice, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 217-236.

Social Media Sentiment Analysis: A New Empirical Tool for Assessing Public Opinion on Crime? / Prichard, Jeremy; Watters, Paul; KRONE, Tony; Spiranovic, Caroline ; COCKBURN, HELEN.

In: Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2015, p. 217-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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