Sodium and bone health

Impact of Moderately High and Low Salt Intakes on Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women

Birgit Teucher, Jack R. Dainty, Caroline A. Spinks, Gosia Majsak-Newman, David J. Berry, Jurian A. Hoogewerff, Robert J. Foxall, Jette Jakobsen, Kevin D. Cashman, Albert Flynn, Susan J. Fairweather-Tait

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response to changes in salt and calcium intake in postmenopausal women. Eleven women completed a randomized cross-over trial consisting of four successive 5-wk periods of controlled dietary intervention, each separated by a minimum 4-wk washout. Moderately low and high calcium (518 versus 1284 mg) and salt (3.9 versus 11.2 g) diets, reflecting lower and upper intakes in postmenopausal women consuming a Western-style diet, were provided. Stable isotope labeling techniques were used to measure calcium absorption and excretion, compartmental modeling was undertaken to estimate bone calcium balance, and biomarkers of bone formation and resorption were measured in blood and urine. Moderately high salt intake (11.2 g/d) elicited a significant increase in urinary calcium excretion (p = 0.0008) and significantly affected bone calcium balance with the high calcium diet (p = 0.024). Efficiency of calcium absorption was higher after a period of moderately low calcium intake (p < 0.05) but was unaffected by salt intake. Salt was responsible for a significant change in bone calcium balance, from positive to negative, when consumed as part of a high calcium diet, but with a low calcium intake, the bone calcium balance was negative on both high and low salt diets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1477-1485
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Salts
Sodium
Calcium
Bone and Bones
Health
Diet
Isotope Labeling
Sodium-Restricted Diet
Bone Resorption
Osteogenesis
Cross-Over Studies
Osteoporosis
Biomarkers
Urine

Cite this

Teucher, Birgit ; Dainty, Jack R. ; Spinks, Caroline A. ; Majsak-Newman, Gosia ; Berry, David J. ; Hoogewerff, Jurian A. ; Foxall, Robert J. ; Jakobsen, Jette ; Cashman, Kevin D. ; Flynn, Albert ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. / Sodium and bone health : Impact of Moderately High and Low Salt Intakes on Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 1477-1485.
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abstract = "High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response to changes in salt and calcium intake in postmenopausal women. Eleven women completed a randomized cross-over trial consisting of four successive 5-wk periods of controlled dietary intervention, each separated by a minimum 4-wk washout. Moderately low and high calcium (518 versus 1284 mg) and salt (3.9 versus 11.2 g) diets, reflecting lower and upper intakes in postmenopausal women consuming a Western-style diet, were provided. Stable isotope labeling techniques were used to measure calcium absorption and excretion, compartmental modeling was undertaken to estimate bone calcium balance, and biomarkers of bone formation and resorption were measured in blood and urine. Moderately high salt intake (11.2 g/d) elicited a significant increase in urinary calcium excretion (p = 0.0008) and significantly affected bone calcium balance with the high calcium diet (p = 0.024). Efficiency of calcium absorption was higher after a period of moderately low calcium intake (p < 0.05) but was unaffected by salt intake. Salt was responsible for a significant change in bone calcium balance, from positive to negative, when consumed as part of a high calcium diet, but with a low calcium intake, the bone calcium balance was negative on both high and low salt diets.",
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Teucher, B, Dainty, JR, Spinks, CA, Majsak-Newman, G, Berry, DJ, Hoogewerff, JA, Foxall, RJ, Jakobsen, J, Cashman, KD, Flynn, A & Fairweather-Tait, SJ 2008, 'Sodium and bone health: Impact of Moderately High and Low Salt Intakes on Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 23, no. 9, pp. 1477-1485. https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.080408

Sodium and bone health : Impact of Moderately High and Low Salt Intakes on Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women. / Teucher, Birgit; Dainty, Jack R.; Spinks, Caroline A.; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Berry, David J.; Hoogewerff, Jurian A.; Foxall, Robert J.; Jakobsen, Jette; Cashman, Kevin D.; Flynn, Albert; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.09.2008, p. 1477-1485.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Impact of Moderately High and Low Salt Intakes on Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women

AU - Teucher, Birgit

AU - Dainty, Jack R.

AU - Spinks, Caroline A.

AU - Majsak-Newman, Gosia

AU - Berry, David J.

AU - Hoogewerff, Jurian A.

AU - Foxall, Robert J.

AU - Jakobsen, Jette

AU - Cashman, Kevin D.

AU - Flynn, Albert

AU - Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

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N2 - High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response to changes in salt and calcium intake in postmenopausal women. Eleven women completed a randomized cross-over trial consisting of four successive 5-wk periods of controlled dietary intervention, each separated by a minimum 4-wk washout. Moderately low and high calcium (518 versus 1284 mg) and salt (3.9 versus 11.2 g) diets, reflecting lower and upper intakes in postmenopausal women consuming a Western-style diet, were provided. Stable isotope labeling techniques were used to measure calcium absorption and excretion, compartmental modeling was undertaken to estimate bone calcium balance, and biomarkers of bone formation and resorption were measured in blood and urine. Moderately high salt intake (11.2 g/d) elicited a significant increase in urinary calcium excretion (p = 0.0008) and significantly affected bone calcium balance with the high calcium diet (p = 0.024). Efficiency of calcium absorption was higher after a period of moderately low calcium intake (p < 0.05) but was unaffected by salt intake. Salt was responsible for a significant change in bone calcium balance, from positive to negative, when consumed as part of a high calcium diet, but with a low calcium intake, the bone calcium balance was negative on both high and low salt diets.

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