Some aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger

Stephen Debus, Gerald Olsen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger were studied in South Australia in the 1970s, and the data on breeding biology not published elsewhere are presented here. Recent body-mass and associated data, and banding and recovery data, were sourced from museums, raptor rehabilitators and the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Schemes. Brood size (young per successful nest) in the 1970s averaged 2.5 (range 1â¿¿4, n = 6). Free-fl ying male Falcons averaged 582 grams (481â¿¿650 g, n = 11), and females 833 grams (710â¿¿950 g, n = 18). Prey remains in Falcon nests included mainly parrots (e.g. Little Corella Cacatua sanguinea, Galah Eolophus roseicapillus (~40% by number), Australian Ringneck Barnardius zonarius), Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes and Australian Magpie Cracticus tibicen. The only banded nestling recovered was found 346 kilometres away, 11 years 7 months later. Common causes of injury and mortality were vehicle collisions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)29-36
    Number of pages8
    JournalCorella
    Volume35
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    falcons
    Falco
    nest
    Biological Sciences
    brood size
    raptor
    reproductive biology
    bat
    nests
    body mass
    museum
    collision
    birds of prey
    bird
    South Australia
    pigeons
    Chiroptera
    birds
    breeding
    young

    Cite this

    Debus, S., & Olsen, G. (2011). Some aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger. Corella, 35(1), 29-36.
    Debus, Stephen ; Olsen, Gerald. / Some aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger. In: Corella. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 29-36.
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    abstract = "Aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger were studied in South Australia in the 1970s, and the data on breeding biology not published elsewhere are presented here. Recent body-mass and associated data, and banding and recovery data, were sourced from museums, raptor rehabilitators and the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Schemes. Brood size (young per successful nest) in the 1970s averaged 2.5 (range 1{\^a}¿¿4, n = 6). Free-fl ying male Falcons averaged 582 grams (481{\^a}¿¿650 g, n = 11), and females 833 grams (710{\^a}¿¿950 g, n = 18). Prey remains in Falcon nests included mainly parrots (e.g. Little Corella Cacatua sanguinea, Galah Eolophus roseicapillus (~40{\%} by number), Australian Ringneck Barnardius zonarius), Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes and Australian Magpie Cracticus tibicen. The only banded nestling recovered was found 346 kilometres away, 11 years 7 months later. Common causes of injury and mortality were vehicle collisions.",
    author = "Stephen Debus and Gerald Olsen",
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    Debus, S & Olsen, G 2011, 'Some aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger', Corella, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 29-36.

    Some aspects of the biology of the Black Falcon Falco subniger. / Debus, Stephen; Olsen, Gerald.

    In: Corella, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2011, p. 29-36.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Debus, Stephen

    AU - Olsen, Gerald

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    Y1 - 2011

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