Sonographer practitioner development in Australia

Qualitative analysis of an Australian sonographers' survey

Rodney McGregor, Kate O'Loughlin, Jennifer Cox, Jill Clarke, Adrian Snowden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sonographer practitioner development involves the expansion and extension of the sonographer role to include reporting on ultrasound examinations. Australian sonographers have not seen the same degree of role extension and expansion as their counterparts in the United Kingdom, despite increasing levels of discussion regarding sonographer practitioner development. The aim of this study was to determine if Australian sonographers want to extend their professional role and what they consider are the important issues associated with role extension. This paper reports on qualitative data derived from a survey of Australian sonographers and investigates if Australian sonographers are interested in extending and expanding their professional role and responsibilities and, if they do, what might be necessary or desirable from a professional point of view for this change to occur. A survey was mailed to all members of the Australian Sonographers Association (ASA) in October 2006. The 31-item survey included 28 closed-ended and 3 opened-ended items to provide both quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative data will be reported separately. Qualitative data was derived from responses to the opened-ended questions, which asked respondents to elaborate on their attitudes and feelings about role extension and development. Analysis used Nvivo7 software to aid in uncovering common themes from the qualitative data. The analysis focused on the reported incentives or motivations for becoming a sonographer practitioner as well as disincentives or perceived hurdles that would discourage respondents from becoming sonographer practitioners. The three most reported incentives or motivations for becoming a sonographer practitioner were professional recognition, remuneration and increased knowledge. The three most commonly reported disincentives or perceived hurdles that would discourage respondents from becoming sonographer practitioners were legal issues, insurance and further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-319
Number of pages7
JournalRadiography
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

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