Spatiotemporal controls of simulated metacommunity dynamics in dendritic networks

D.A. Auerbach, LeRoy POFF

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Understanding the mechanisms that create spatial and temporal patterns of functional diversity in stream networks is a goal of basic research and has implications for effective conservation of freshwater ecosystems. These patterns are likely to be influenced by the combination of temporally variable environmental conditions, movement constraints imposed by network structure, and the trait composition of local communities. We developed a simplified metacommunity model to investigate complex interactions among these factors under lottery competition for local resources, such as establishment sites. We used this model to examine how local and regional community composition varied in 3 scenarios: a null implementation involving only spatial effects, an implementation that combined network constraints with dispersal-trait variation, and an implementation in which a trade-off between multiple functional traits was paired with varying levels of temporal autocorrelation in the intensity of mortality. These simulations clarified the conditions that allow a single functional strategy to exclude others in a dendritic network and demonstrated 2 distinct modes of regional partitioning that can support the persistence of multiple functional strategies within such networks. The results suggested that the emergence of watershed or headwater–outlet partitioning depends on the functional dispersal differences present in the metacommunity and that autocorrelated mortality levels can collapse these regional divisions when they depend on a trade-off between dispersal ability and mortality resistance. We discuss the need to confront the complexity of interacting controls on community composition in rivers and streams and suggest opportunities to move beyond the basic framework we present
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)235-251
    Number of pages17
    JournalJournal of the North American Benthological Society
    Volume30
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    mortality
    trade-off
    community composition
    partitioning
    freshwater ecosystem
    functional diversity
    autocorrelation
    persistence
    environmental conditions
    watershed
    environmental factors
    rivers
    resource
    river
    simulation
    effect
    freshwater ecosystems

    Cite this

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    title = "Spatiotemporal controls of simulated metacommunity dynamics in dendritic networks",
    abstract = "Understanding the mechanisms that create spatial and temporal patterns of functional diversity in stream networks is a goal of basic research and has implications for effective conservation of freshwater ecosystems. These patterns are likely to be influenced by the combination of temporally variable environmental conditions, movement constraints imposed by network structure, and the trait composition of local communities. We developed a simplified metacommunity model to investigate complex interactions among these factors under lottery competition for local resources, such as establishment sites. We used this model to examine how local and regional community composition varied in 3 scenarios: a null implementation involving only spatial effects, an implementation that combined network constraints with dispersal-trait variation, and an implementation in which a trade-off between multiple functional traits was paired with varying levels of temporal autocorrelation in the intensity of mortality. These simulations clarified the conditions that allow a single functional strategy to exclude others in a dendritic network and demonstrated 2 distinct modes of regional partitioning that can support the persistence of multiple functional strategies within such networks. The results suggested that the emergence of watershed or headwater–outlet partitioning depends on the functional dispersal differences present in the metacommunity and that autocorrelated mortality levels can collapse these regional divisions when they depend on a trade-off between dispersal ability and mortality resistance. We discuss the need to confront the complexity of interacting controls on community composition in rivers and streams and suggest opportunities to move beyond the basic framework we present",
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    Spatiotemporal controls of simulated metacommunity dynamics in dendritic networks. / Auerbach, D.A.; POFF, LeRoy.

    In: Journal of the North American Benthological Society, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2011, p. 235-251.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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