Sponges as sentinels: Metal accumulation using transplanted sponges across a metal gradient

A Davis, Corrine De Mestre, Bill MAHER, Allison Broad

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To be effective sentinels, organisms must be able to be readily translocated to contamination hotspots. The authors sought to assess metal accumulation in genetically identical explants of a relatively common estuarine sponge, Suberites cf. diversicolor. Explants were transplanted to 7 locations across a metal contamination gradient in a large coastal estuary in southeastern Australia to establish, first, that explants of this species could be successfully translocated; second, that explants accumulated metals (cadmium, copper, lead, selenium, and zinc) sufficiently rapidly to be effective sentinels; third, that rates of metal accumulation in explants were in agreement with metal concentrations within sediments (
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2818-2825
    Number of pages8
    JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
    Volume33
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Porifera
    sponge
    Metals
    metal
    Suberites
    Contamination
    Estuaries
    Selenium
    Cadmium
    selenium
    Zinc
    Copper
    hot spot
    Sediments
    cadmium
    zinc
    estuary
    cyhalothrin
    copper
    sediment

    Cite this

    Davis, A ; De Mestre, Corrine ; MAHER, Bill ; Broad, Allison. / Sponges as sentinels: Metal accumulation using transplanted sponges across a metal gradient. In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 2014 ; Vol. 33, No. 12. pp. 2818-2825.
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    Sponges as sentinels: Metal accumulation using transplanted sponges across a metal gradient. / Davis, A; De Mestre, Corrine; MAHER, Bill; Broad, Allison.

    In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 33, No. 12, 2014, p. 2818-2825.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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