Sponges as sentinels: Metal accumulation using transplanted sponges across a metal gradient

A Davis, Corrine De Mestre, Bill MAHER, Allison Broad

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To be effective sentinels, organisms must be able to be readily translocated to contamination hotspots. The authors sought to assess metal accumulation in genetically identical explants of a relatively common estuarine sponge, Suberites cf. diversicolor. Explants were transplanted to 7 locations across a metal contamination gradient in a large coastal estuary in southeastern Australia to establish, first, that explants of this species could be successfully translocated; second, that explants accumulated metals (cadmium, copper, lead, selenium, and zinc) sufficiently rapidly to be effective sentinels; third, that rates of metal accumulation in explants were in agreement with metal concentrations within sediments (
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2818-2825
    Number of pages8
    JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
    Volume33
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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