Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review

Jessica Kohne, Michael Orsmbee, Andrew MCKUNE

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalSports
    Volume4
    Issue number51
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Muscles
    Myalgia
    Sex Characteristics
    Blood Proteins

    Cite this

    @article{e0a1e251da0241849a5d00ef4eb292bf,
    title = "Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review",
    abstract = "Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females",
    author = "Jessica Kohne and Michael Orsmbee and Andrew MCKUNE",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.3390/sports4040051",
    language = "English",
    volume = "4",
    pages = "1--14",
    journal = "Sports",
    issn = "2075-4663",
    number = "51",

    }

    Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review. / Kohne, Jessica; Orsmbee, Michael; MCKUNE, Andrew.

    In: Sports, Vol. 4, No. 51, 2016, p. 1-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Supplementation Strategies to Reduce Muscle Damage and Improve Recovery Following Exercise in Females: A Systematic Review

    AU - Kohne, Jessica

    AU - Orsmbee, Michael

    AU - MCKUNE, Andrew

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females

    AB - Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) caused by unaccustomed or strenuous exercise can result in reduced muscle force, increased muscle soreness, increased intramuscular proteins in the blood, and reduced performance. Pre- and post-exercise optimal nutritional intake is important to assist with muscle-damage repair and reconditioning to allow for an accelerated recovery. The increased demand for training and competing on consecutive days has led to a variety of intervention strategies being used to reduce the negative effects of EIMD. Nutritional intervention strategies are largely tested on male participants, and few report on sex-related differences relating to the effects of the interventions employed. This review focuses on nutritional intervention strategies employed to negate the effects of EIMD, focussing solely on females

    U2 - 10.3390/sports4040051

    DO - 10.3390/sports4040051

    M3 - Article

    VL - 4

    SP - 1

    EP - 14

    JO - Sports

    JF - Sports

    SN - 2075-4663

    IS - 51

    ER -