Supporting new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice: Views from experienced rural nurses

Jacqueline Lea, Mary CRUICKSHANK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To present the findings from the experienced rural nurse participants of a larger study that explored the transitional experiences of newly graduated nurses making the role transition in rural health care facilities in Australia. Background: There are specific and unique aspects of rural nursing practice that influence the nature and timing of support for new graduate nurses that have not been explored or acknowledged as influencing the new graduate nurses' experience of transition. Specifically, the difficulties and challenges that experienced rural nurses face in providing effective and timely support for new graduate nurses who are making the transition to rural nursing practice is yet to be explored. Design: Using a qualitative case study framework, this study specifically aimed to investigate and describe the nature and timing of support required during the transition to nursing practice that is specific for the rural context and capacity. Methods: Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 experienced rural nurses who, at the time of the study, worked with new graduate nurses in the rural practice environment. Results: The findings from this study showed that the provision of timely on-ward support for new graduates making the transition to rural nursing practice is affected and influenced by the skill mix and staffing allocation within the rural environment. As well, there is a lack of awareness by rural nurses of how to meet the on-ward support needs of new graduate nurses. Conclusions: This study has identified the specific and unique aspects of the rural nurse's role and responsibilities for which the new graduate nurse requires incremental learning and intensive clinical support. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings can be used by rural health services and experienced rural registered nurses to assist in implementing adequate and timely support for new graduate nurses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2826-2834
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume24
Issue number19-20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Rural Nursing
Nurses
Nurse's Role
Rural Health Services
Rural Health
Time and Motion Studies
Health Facilities

Cite this

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title = "Supporting new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice: Views from experienced rural nurses",
abstract = "Aims and objectives: To present the findings from the experienced rural nurse participants of a larger study that explored the transitional experiences of newly graduated nurses making the role transition in rural health care facilities in Australia. Background: There are specific and unique aspects of rural nursing practice that influence the nature and timing of support for new graduate nurses that have not been explored or acknowledged as influencing the new graduate nurses' experience of transition. Specifically, the difficulties and challenges that experienced rural nurses face in providing effective and timely support for new graduate nurses who are making the transition to rural nursing practice is yet to be explored. Design: Using a qualitative case study framework, this study specifically aimed to investigate and describe the nature and timing of support required during the transition to nursing practice that is specific for the rural context and capacity. Methods: Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 experienced rural nurses who, at the time of the study, worked with new graduate nurses in the rural practice environment. Results: The findings from this study showed that the provision of timely on-ward support for new graduates making the transition to rural nursing practice is affected and influenced by the skill mix and staffing allocation within the rural environment. As well, there is a lack of awareness by rural nurses of how to meet the on-ward support needs of new graduate nurses. Conclusions: This study has identified the specific and unique aspects of the rural nurse's role and responsibilities for which the new graduate nurse requires incremental learning and intensive clinical support. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings can be used by rural health services and experienced rural registered nurses to assist in implementing adequate and timely support for new graduate nurses.",
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Supporting new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice: Views from experienced rural nurses. / Lea, Jacqueline; CRUICKSHANK, Mary.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 19-20, 2015, p. 2826-2834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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