Supporting recovery from hoarding and squalor: Insights from a community case study

Toby Raeburn, Catherine HUNGERFORD, Phil Escott, Michelle Cleary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hoarding and squalor are more common among people with chronic mental disorders and can compromise a person's health and safety, be a public health issue and present substantial challenges to family, carers, social service agencies and clinical mental health services. This paper provides a case study outlining the complex challenges experienced by a person exhibiting hoarding and squalor behaviours, and explores the role of a mental health nurse in supporting the person towards recovery. The journey towards mental health recovery for a person with hoarding and squalor behaviours is multidynamic and requires more than clinical expertise or discreet psychotherapeutic modalities. People with hoarding behaviours acquire a large number of possessions that are often of limited or no monetary value and which they are unable or unwilling to discard. Such behaviours can substantially impair a person's ability to attend to their normal daily activities, cause substantial distress and lead to squalid living conditions. Living in squalor can compromise a person's health and safety, be a public health issue and present substantial challenges to family, carers, social service agencies and clinical mental health services. Hoarding and squalor behaviours are more common among people with co-morbid organic and mental illness, such as developmental delay, schizophrenia, alcohol dependence and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder. This paper provides a narrative that explores the role of one Australian mental health nurse practitioner in the recovery of a person with hoarding behaviours.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-639
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Mental Health
Mental Health Services
Social Work
Caregivers
Public Health
Safety
Aptitude
Nurse Practitioners
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Social Conditions
Health
Hoarding
Mental Disorders
Alcoholism
Schizophrenia
Nurses

Cite this

Raeburn, Toby ; HUNGERFORD, Catherine ; Escott, Phil ; Cleary, Michelle. / Supporting recovery from hoarding and squalor: Insights from a community case study. In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2015 ; Vol. 22, No. 8. pp. 634-639.
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Supporting recovery from hoarding and squalor: Insights from a community case study. / Raeburn, Toby; HUNGERFORD, Catherine; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle.

In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 8, 2015, p. 634-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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