Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors

Olivier Girard, Sébastien Racinais, Julien D. Périard

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Abstract

Objectives To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and - 200 ms during brief (3-5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before ( prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. Results The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition ( p<0.05). Reductions in KE RTD occurred within the 0-200 ms epoch after contraction onset postmatch and at 24 h, compared with prematch, independent of environmental conditions ( p<0.05). A similar reduction in the KE peak RTD was also observed postmatch relative to prematch ( p<0.05). No differences in KE RTD values were observed after normalisation to MVC torque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. Conclusions In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)i52-i58
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume48
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Tennis
Torque
Knee
Muscles
Isometric Contraction
Lower Extremity
Hot Temperature

Cite this

@article{b62286856e0b406b8d79a2c0777a09ce,
title = "Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors",
abstract = "Objectives To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and - 200 ms during brief (3-5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before ( prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. Results The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition ( p<0.05). Reductions in KE RTD occurred within the 0-200 ms epoch after contraction onset postmatch and at 24 h, compared with prematch, independent of environmental conditions ( p<0.05). A similar reduction in the KE peak RTD was also observed postmatch relative to prematch ( p<0.05). No differences in KE RTD values were observed after normalisation to MVC torque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. Conclusions In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF.",
keywords = "Body Temperature Regulation/physiology, Cold Temperature, Electromyography, Hot Temperature, Humans, Isometric Contraction/physiology, Knee Joint/physiology, Male, Motor Neurons/physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Tennis/physiology, Torque, Young Adult",
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year = "2014",
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volume = "48",
pages = "i52--i58",
journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0306-3674",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

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Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors. / Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sébastien; Périard, Julien D.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. SUPPL. 1, 2014, p. i52-i58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors

AU - Girard, Olivier

AU - Racinais, Sébastien

AU - Périard, Julien D.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objectives To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and - 200 ms during brief (3-5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before ( prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. Results The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition ( p<0.05). Reductions in KE RTD occurred within the 0-200 ms epoch after contraction onset postmatch and at 24 h, compared with prematch, independent of environmental conditions ( p<0.05). A similar reduction in the KE peak RTD was also observed postmatch relative to prematch ( p<0.05). No differences in KE RTD values were observed after normalisation to MVC torque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. Conclusions In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF.

AB - Objectives To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and - 200 ms during brief (3-5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before ( prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. Results The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition ( p<0.05). Reductions in KE RTD occurred within the 0-200 ms epoch after contraction onset postmatch and at 24 h, compared with prematch, independent of environmental conditions ( p<0.05). A similar reduction in the KE peak RTD was also observed postmatch relative to prematch ( p<0.05). No differences in KE RTD values were observed after normalisation to MVC torque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. Conclusions In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF.

KW - Body Temperature Regulation/physiology

KW - Cold Temperature

KW - Electromyography

KW - Hot Temperature

KW - Humans

KW - Isometric Contraction/physiology

KW - Knee Joint/physiology

KW - Male

KW - Motor Neurons/physiology

KW - Muscle, Skeletal/physiology

KW - Tennis/physiology

KW - Torque

KW - Young Adult

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898679884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093286

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093286

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - i52-i58

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -