Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Changes in Male and Female Athletes Relative to Training Status

Christian J. Cook, Blair T. Crewther, Liam P. Kilduff, Linda L. Agnew, Phillip Fourie, Benjamin G. Serpell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To establish if training volume was associated with androgen baselines and androgen responsiveness to acute exercise.

Methods: During a "high-volume" training phase, 28 cyclists (14 men and 14 women) undertook oxygen-uptake and maximal-work-capacity testing. Two days later, they completed a repeat-sprint protocol, which was repeated 3 weeks later during a "low-volume" phase. Blood and saliva samples were collected before and after (+5 and +60 min) the repeat-sprint protocol. Blood was assayed for total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and saliva, for testosterone and DHT.

Results: Pretrial TT, FT, and DHT concentration was greater for males (P < .001, large effect size differences), and in both genders TT, DHT, and saliva for DHT was higher during high-volume loading (moderate to large effect size). Area-under-the-curve analysis revealed larger TT, FT, and DHT responses to the repeat-sprint protocol among females, and high-volume training was linked to larger TT, DHT, and saliva for DHT responses (moderate to large effect size). Baseline TT and FT correlated with oxygen uptake and work capacity in both genders (P < .05).

Conclusion: DHT showed no acute performance correlation but was responsive to volume of training, particularly in females. This work informs on timelines and relationships of androgenic biomarkers in males and females across different training loads, adding to the complexity that should be considered in interpretation thereof. The authors speculate that testosterone may impact acute performance via behavioral mechanisms of motivation and attention; DHT, via training volume-induced androgenic promotion, may facilitate long-term adaptive changes, especially for females.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1700-1706
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume16
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone Changes in Male and Female Athletes Relative to Training Status'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this