The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development.

Marjorie ATCHAN, Deborah DAVIS, Maralyn Foureur

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

Abstract

Issues: The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched globally by UNICEF in 1991. The Australian College of Midwives assumed governance in 1994. Implementation in Australia has ‘in principle’ support at a national and governmental level as well as inclusion in health policy in several states. Currently 19% or 77 of a potential 394 facilities are ‘baby friendly’ accredited with significant variation across States and Territories. Australian studies, although few in number, reveal the existence of multi-level barriers.
Approach: A case study research approach was used to examine the early operationalizing of a global health promotion strategy in a national setting, with the view to understanding the current variance in uptake. Relevant literature and archival data have been reviewed. Interviews with key stakeholders to provide an oral history have been attended.
Key Findings: The initial implementation process encountered a number of unforeseen obstacles. UNICEF Australia’s brief included handing over the Initiative to an appropriate champion within a predetermined timeframe. The Australian Federal government did not take up the offer. Some stakeholders expressed the opinion that due process surrounding the subsequent search for other opportunities was not followed. The Australian College of Midwives (ACM) assumed governance in 1994. Unexpected administrative and financial issues challenged the College’s pursuit of support for BFHI in Australia.
Implications and Conclusions: The consequences of the initial implementation process and outcome have contributed, in part, to a lack of commitment to and understanding of the Initiative by policy makers, health professionals, health administrators and clinicians.
Original languageEnglish
Pages6-6
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventThe Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference” - Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 1 Aug 20143 Aug 2014

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period1/08/143/08/14

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United Nations
Midwifery
Administrative Personnel
Interviews
Civil Rights
Federal Government
Health
Health Policy
Health Promotion
Research
Infant Health
Global Health

Cite this

ATCHAN, M., DAVIS, D., & Foureur, M. (2014). The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development.. 6-6. Abstract from The Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”, Melbourne, Australia.
ATCHAN, Marjorie ; DAVIS, Deborah ; Foureur, Maralyn. / The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development. Abstract from The Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”, Melbourne, Australia.1 p.
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ATCHAN, M, DAVIS, D & Foureur, M 2014, 'The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development.' The Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”, Melbourne, Australia, 1/08/14 - 3/08/14, pp. 6-6.

The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development. / ATCHAN, Marjorie; DAVIS, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn.

2014. 6-6 Abstract from The Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

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ATCHAN M, DAVIS D, Foureur M. The Baby Friendly Health Initiative Australia: early influences on uptake and development.. 2014. Abstract from The Australian Breastfeeding Association “Liquid Gold, the 50th Anniversary Conference”, Melbourne, Australia.