The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia

Desirable strategy or lame duck?

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

Abstract

Breastfeeding is the biological norm and an important health strategy. Breastfeeding prevalence in Australia is comparable to other high-income nations though duration falls short of national targets. The Baby Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) is a global multi-faceted strategy that aims to create a positive breastfeeding “culture”.
International impact studies have identified a positive association between the initiative and breastfeeding trends however in Australia BFHI struggles to gain momentum with 19% of facilities currently accredited. Australian studies have identified several impediments: a misunderstanding of the initiative's aims, a discord with practice and organisational attitudinal issues. Critics have recommended redirecting any proposed funding as the initiative has not proven its applicability to the Australian context.
This poster discusses the social context in which feeding practices occur and explores the state of evidence on which the Baby Friendly Health Initiative is founded. The weight of evidence supporting breastfeeding is reconsidered to critique the current state of knowledge on which breastfeeding promotion activities are based. The challenge of successfully developing and reporting breastfeeding indicators is also examined. The impact of breastfeeding is then explored in order to examine the relationship between breastfeeding and BFHI practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pagess22-s23
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventThe Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” - Wrest Point Convention Centre , Hobart, Australia
Duration: 30 Sep 20133 Oct 2013

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery”
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period30/09/133/10/13

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Breast Feeding
Infant Health
Posters
Weights and Measures
Health

Cite this

ATCHAN, M. (2013). The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia: Desirable strategy or lame duck?. s22-s23. Abstract from The Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” , Hobart, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.163
ATCHAN, Marjorie. / The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia : Desirable strategy or lame duck?. Abstract from The Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” , Hobart, Australia.2 p.
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abstract = "Breastfeeding is the biological norm and an important health strategy. Breastfeeding prevalence in Australia is comparable to other high-income nations though duration falls short of national targets. The Baby Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) is a global multi-faceted strategy that aims to create a positive breastfeeding “culture”.International impact studies have identified a positive association between the initiative and breastfeeding trends however in Australia BFHI struggles to gain momentum with 19{\%} of facilities currently accredited. Australian studies have identified several impediments: a misunderstanding of the initiative's aims, a discord with practice and organisational attitudinal issues. Critics have recommended redirecting any proposed funding as the initiative has not proven its applicability to the Australian context.This poster discusses the social context in which feeding practices occur and explores the state of evidence on which the Baby Friendly Health Initiative is founded. The weight of evidence supporting breastfeeding is reconsidered to critique the current state of knowledge on which breastfeeding promotion activities are based. The challenge of successfully developing and reporting breastfeeding indicators is also examined. The impact of breastfeeding is then explored in order to examine the relationship between breastfeeding and BFHI practices.",
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ATCHAN, M 2013, 'The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia: Desirable strategy or lame duck?' The Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” , Hobart, Australia, 30/09/13 - 3/10/13, pp. s22-s23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.163

The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia : Desirable strategy or lame duck? / ATCHAN, Marjorie.

2013. s22-s23 Abstract from The Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” , Hobart, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

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T2 - Desirable strategy or lame duck?

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PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

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AB - Breastfeeding is the biological norm and an important health strategy. Breastfeeding prevalence in Australia is comparable to other high-income nations though duration falls short of national targets. The Baby Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) is a global multi-faceted strategy that aims to create a positive breastfeeding “culture”.International impact studies have identified a positive association between the initiative and breastfeeding trends however in Australia BFHI struggles to gain momentum with 19% of facilities currently accredited. Australian studies have identified several impediments: a misunderstanding of the initiative's aims, a discord with practice and organisational attitudinal issues. Critics have recommended redirecting any proposed funding as the initiative has not proven its applicability to the Australian context.This poster discusses the social context in which feeding practices occur and explores the state of evidence on which the Baby Friendly Health Initiative is founded. The weight of evidence supporting breastfeeding is reconsidered to critique the current state of knowledge on which breastfeeding promotion activities are based. The challenge of successfully developing and reporting breastfeeding indicators is also examined. The impact of breastfeeding is then explored in order to examine the relationship between breastfeeding and BFHI practices.

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DO - 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.163

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ATCHAN M. The Baby Friendly Health Initiative in Australia: Desirable strategy or lame duck?. 2013. Abstract from The Australian College of Midwives 18th Biennial Conference “Life, Art & Science in Midwifery” , Hobart, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.163