The civil service and public services management systems

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

Citizens and civil society have most contact with the administrative apparatus of the UK state, whose operations can powerfully condition life chances and experiences. Patrick Dunleavy considers the responsiveness of traditionally dominant civil service headquartered in Whitehall, and the wider administration of key public services, notably the NHS, policing and other administrations in England. Are public managers at all levels of the UK and England accountable enough to citizens, public opinion and elected representatives and legislatures? And how representative of, and in touch with, modern Britain are public bureaucracies?
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe UK's Changing Democracy
Subtitle of host publicationThe 2018 Democratic Audit
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherLSE Press
Chapter5.3
Pages223-236
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781909890466, 9781909890473, 9781909890480
ISBN (Print)9781909890442
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

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civil service
public service
citizens' society
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bureaucracy
public opinion
civil society
contact
manager
citizen
experience

Cite this

DUNLEAVY, P. (2018). The civil service and public services management systems. In The UK's Changing Democracy: The 2018 Democratic Audit (pp. 223-236). London, UK: LSE Press. https://doi.org/10.31389/book1.p
DUNLEAVY, Patrick. / The civil service and public services management systems. The UK's Changing Democracy: The 2018 Democratic Audit. London, UK : LSE Press, 2018. pp. 223-236
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DUNLEAVY, P 2018, The civil service and public services management systems. in The UK's Changing Democracy: The 2018 Democratic Audit. LSE Press, London, UK, pp. 223-236. https://doi.org/10.31389/book1.p

The civil service and public services management systems. / DUNLEAVY, Patrick.

The UK's Changing Democracy: The 2018 Democratic Audit. London, UK : LSE Press, 2018. p. 223-236.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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DUNLEAVY P. The civil service and public services management systems. In The UK's Changing Democracy: The 2018 Democratic Audit. London, UK: LSE Press. 2018. p. 223-236 https://doi.org/10.31389/book1.p