The dark side of responsible business management

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

This chapter is a reflection of both research and experience in the Indigenous small business space, written for those interested in understanding some of the stressors experienced by Indigenous Australian entrepreneurs. The author is an Aboriginal business scholar who has owned and operated several enterprises. If policy-makers and a wider audience are better informed about Indigenous peoples and business, perhaps they can show more ethical and responsible behavior with increased positive interaction when dealing with Indigenous enterprises. It is undeniable that Indigenous small business creation is an important mechanism within Indigenous economic development. Policies driven both by the state and nongovernment organizations (NGOs) recognize this. However, a dichotomy exists in neo-liberal philosophy, with reduced funding for welfare, education, and social support, while purportedly promoting wealth creation through Indigenous enterprise. We must acknowledge and accept that the cause of Indigenous welfare dependency and poverty is a direct outcome of colonization. Modern Indigenous enterprise creation is often a misguided attempt by the colonizer to rebuild commercial enterprise and wealth that existed for Aboriginals prior to invasion. The state, thus, finances the symptoms and not the causation of poverty. The state may have good intentions, but their implementation and foresight is similar to that of “Mr. Magoo”: blind to policy that is often lacking empirical data and/or community interaction.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIndigenous Aspirations and Rights
Subtitle of host publicationThe Case for Responsible Business and Management
EditorsAmy Klemm Verbos, Ella Henry, Ana Maria Peredo
Place of PublicationOxon, UK
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter2
Pages22-33
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781783534005
ISBN (Print)9781783533237, 9781783533992
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Publication series

NameThe Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series
PublisherGreenleaf Publishing

Fingerprint

Business management
Interaction
Poverty
Small business
Funding
Entrepreneurs
Indigenous peoples
Foresight
Politicians
Social support
Colonization
Causation
Stressors
Finance
Dichotomy
Wealth
Wealth creation
Empirical data
Education
Economic development

Cite this

FOLEY, D. (2017). The dark side of responsible business management. In A. Klemm Verbos, E. Henry, & A. M. Peredo (Eds.), Indigenous Aspirations and Rights: The Case for Responsible Business and Management (pp. 22-33). (The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series ). Oxon, UK: Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351270182
FOLEY, Dennis. / The dark side of responsible business management. Indigenous Aspirations and Rights: The Case for Responsible Business and Management. editor / Amy Klemm Verbos ; Ella Henry ; Ana Maria Peredo. Oxon, UK : Taylor & Francis, 2017. pp. 22-33 (The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series ).
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FOLEY, D 2017, The dark side of responsible business management. in A Klemm Verbos, E Henry & AM Peredo (eds), Indigenous Aspirations and Rights: The Case for Responsible Business and Management. The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series , Taylor & Francis, Oxon, UK, pp. 22-33. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351270182

The dark side of responsible business management. / FOLEY, Dennis.

Indigenous Aspirations and Rights: The Case for Responsible Business and Management. ed. / Amy Klemm Verbos; Ella Henry; Ana Maria Peredo. Oxon, UK : Taylor & Francis, 2017. p. 22-33 (The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series ).

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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FOLEY D. The dark side of responsible business management. In Klemm Verbos A, Henry E, Peredo AM, editors, Indigenous Aspirations and Rights: The Case for Responsible Business and Management. Oxon, UK: Taylor & Francis. 2017. p. 22-33. (The Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) Series ). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351270182