The Development of Children's Gender-Science Stereotypes: A Meta-analysis of 5 Decades of U.S. Draw-A-Scientist Studies

David I. Miller, Kyle M. Nolla, Alice H. Eagly, David H. Uttal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This meta-analysis, spanning 5 decades of Draw-A-Scientist studies, examined U.S. children's gender-science stereotypes linking science with men. These stereotypes should have weakened over time because women's representation in science has risen substantially in the United States, and mass media increasingly depict female scientists. Based on 78 studies (N = 20,860; grades K-12), children's drawings of scientists depicted female scientists more often in later decades, but less often among older children. Children's depictions of scientists therefore have become more gender diverse over time, but children still associate science with men as they grow older. These results may reflect that children observe more male than female scientists in their environments, even though women's representation in science has increased over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1943-1955
Number of pages13
JournalChild Development
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

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