The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia

Ann Harding, Rachel Lloyd, Neil Warren

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study examines the distribution of household income, and of selected taxes and benefits in Australia, in 2001-02. We find that direct cash transfers are more progressive than indirect (non-cash) benefits, but that the combined overall impact of all benefits remains strongly redistributive towards lower income Australians. Similarly, the regressive impact of the indirect taxes considered in our study partially offsets the highly progressive impact of direct taxes but the overall impact of the taxes considered remains strongly pro-poor.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation
    EditorsDimitri B Papadimitriou
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Pages176-201
    Number of pages26
    ISBN (Print)9781403996251
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Tax
    Government
    Cash transfers
    Indirect taxes
    Low income
    Household income

    Cite this

    Harding, A., Lloyd, R., & Warren, N. (2006). The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. In D. B. Papadimitriou (Ed.), The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation (pp. 176-201). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Harding, Ann ; Lloyd, Rachel ; Warren, Neil. / The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation. editor / Dimitri B Papadimitriou. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. pp. 176-201
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    abstract = "This study examines the distribution of household income, and of selected taxes and benefits in Australia, in 2001-02. We find that direct cash transfers are more progressive than indirect (non-cash) benefits, but that the combined overall impact of all benefits remains strongly redistributive towards lower income Australians. Similarly, the regressive impact of the indirect taxes considered in our study partially offsets the highly progressive impact of direct taxes but the overall impact of the taxes considered remains strongly pro-poor.",
    author = "Ann Harding and Rachel Lloyd and Neil Warren",
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    Harding, A, Lloyd, R & Warren, N 2006, The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. in DB Papadimitriou (ed.), The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, pp. 176-201.

    The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. / Harding, Ann; Lloyd, Rachel; Warren, Neil.

    The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation. ed. / Dimitri B Papadimitriou. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. p. 176-201.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    AU - Lloyd, Rachel

    AU - Warren, Neil

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    AB - This study examines the distribution of household income, and of selected taxes and benefits in Australia, in 2001-02. We find that direct cash transfers are more progressive than indirect (non-cash) benefits, but that the combined overall impact of all benefits remains strongly redistributive towards lower income Australians. Similarly, the regressive impact of the indirect taxes considered in our study partially offsets the highly progressive impact of direct taxes but the overall impact of the taxes considered remains strongly pro-poor.

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    BT - The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation

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    Harding A, Lloyd R, Warren N. The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. In Papadimitriou DB, editor, The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 2006. p. 176-201