The effect of low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait

S J Russo, L S Chipchase

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated whether low-Dye anti-pronation taping altered peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. The Emed-AT-2 platform system was used to measure peak plantar pressures. Forty subjects performed two sets of six walks over the Emed-AT-2 forceplate. One set of walks was performed barefoot whilst the other set was performed with the low-Dye tape applied to the right foot. Computer software divided the heel, midfoot and forefoot into six areas (masks) for analysis. The mean for the peak plantar pressures (N/cm(2)) of each of these masks was determined for both sets of walks. Paired t-tests found a significant difference between the barefoot and taped peak plantar pressures in each of the six masks. Overall low-Dye anti-pronation taping significantly altered the peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. Of particular interest was that a significant reduction in mean peak plantar pressure was observed in the medial midfoot (1.4 N/cm(2)) whilst a significant increase occurred in the lateral midfoot (2.6 N/cm(2)).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physiotherapy
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Gait
Foot
Coloring Agents
Pressure
Masks
Pronation
Heel
Software

Cite this

Russo, S J ; Chipchase, L S. / The effect of low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. In: Journal of Physiotherapy. 2001 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 239-244.
@article{dfe345d5e0234d4599899f5ef6f3ab07,
title = "The effect of low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait",
abstract = "This study investigated whether low-Dye anti-pronation taping altered peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. The Emed-AT-2 platform system was used to measure peak plantar pressures. Forty subjects performed two sets of six walks over the Emed-AT-2 forceplate. One set of walks was performed barefoot whilst the other set was performed with the low-Dye tape applied to the right foot. Computer software divided the heel, midfoot and forefoot into six areas (masks) for analysis. The mean for the peak plantar pressures (N/cm(2)) of each of these masks was determined for both sets of walks. Paired t-tests found a significant difference between the barefoot and taped peak plantar pressures in each of the six masks. Overall low-Dye anti-pronation taping significantly altered the peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. Of particular interest was that a significant reduction in mean peak plantar pressure was observed in the medial midfoot (1.4 N/cm(2)) whilst a significant increase occurred in the lateral midfoot (2.6 N/cm(2)).",
keywords = "Adult, Analysis of Variance, Bandages, Female, Forefoot, Human, Heel, Humans, Male, Podiatry, Pressure, Pronation, Reproducibility of Results, Walking, Journal Article",
author = "Russo, {S J} and Chipchase, {L S}",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60271-3",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "239--244",
journal = "Australian Journal of Physiotherapy",
issn = "0004-9514",
publisher = "Australian Physiotherapy Association",
number = "4",

}

The effect of low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. / Russo, S J; Chipchase, L S.

In: Journal of Physiotherapy, Vol. 47, No. 4, 2001, p. 239-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait

AU - Russo, S J

AU - Chipchase, L S

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This study investigated whether low-Dye anti-pronation taping altered peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. The Emed-AT-2 platform system was used to measure peak plantar pressures. Forty subjects performed two sets of six walks over the Emed-AT-2 forceplate. One set of walks was performed barefoot whilst the other set was performed with the low-Dye tape applied to the right foot. Computer software divided the heel, midfoot and forefoot into six areas (masks) for analysis. The mean for the peak plantar pressures (N/cm(2)) of each of these masks was determined for both sets of walks. Paired t-tests found a significant difference between the barefoot and taped peak plantar pressures in each of the six masks. Overall low-Dye anti-pronation taping significantly altered the peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. Of particular interest was that a significant reduction in mean peak plantar pressure was observed in the medial midfoot (1.4 N/cm(2)) whilst a significant increase occurred in the lateral midfoot (2.6 N/cm(2)).

AB - This study investigated whether low-Dye anti-pronation taping altered peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. The Emed-AT-2 platform system was used to measure peak plantar pressures. Forty subjects performed two sets of six walks over the Emed-AT-2 forceplate. One set of walks was performed barefoot whilst the other set was performed with the low-Dye tape applied to the right foot. Computer software divided the heel, midfoot and forefoot into six areas (masks) for analysis. The mean for the peak plantar pressures (N/cm(2)) of each of these masks was determined for both sets of walks. Paired t-tests found a significant difference between the barefoot and taped peak plantar pressures in each of the six masks. Overall low-Dye anti-pronation taping significantly altered the peak plantar pressures of normal feet during gait. Of particular interest was that a significant reduction in mean peak plantar pressure was observed in the medial midfoot (1.4 N/cm(2)) whilst a significant increase occurred in the lateral midfoot (2.6 N/cm(2)).

KW - Adult

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Bandages

KW - Female

KW - Forefoot, Human

KW - Heel

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Podiatry

KW - Pressure

KW - Pronation

KW - Reproducibility of Results

KW - Walking

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60271-3

DO - 10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60271-3

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 239

EP - 244

JO - Australian Journal of Physiotherapy

JF - Australian Journal of Physiotherapy

SN - 0004-9514

IS - 4

ER -