The effect of self-even-and variable-pacing strategies on the physiological and perceptual response to cycling

Kevin Thomas, Mark Stone, Kevin Thompson, Alan St Claire Gibson, Les Ansley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    It has been proposed that an even-pacing strategy is optimal for events lasting <120 s, but this assertion is not well-established. This study tested the hypothesis that even-paced cycling is less challenging than self- or variable-paced cycling. Ten well-trained male cyclists (VO2max, 4.89 ± 0.32 L min(-1)) completed a self-paced (SP) 20-km time trial followed by time- and work-matched even-paced (EP 100% SP mean power) and variable-paced (VP 142 and 72% SP mean power, 1:1.5 high:low power ratio) trials in a random, counterbalanced order. During all trials expired air and heart rate were analysed throughout, blood lactate was sampled every 4 km, and perceptual responses (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and affect) were assessed every 2 km and post-trial. There were no whole trial statistically significant differences between trials for any of the respiratory variables measured, although there was a trend for higher RER's in VP compared to EP (P = 0.053). Blood lactate was lower in EP compared to VP (P = 0.001) and SP (P = 0.001), and higher in SP compared to VP (P = 0.008). RPE was lower, and affect more positive, in EP compared to both SP and VP (P > 0.05). The results of this study show that, for a time- and work-matched 20-km time trial, an even-paced strategy results in attenuated perturbations in the physiological response and lower perception of effort in comparison to self- and variable-paced strategies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3069-3078
    Number of pages10
    JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
    Volume112
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

    Cite this

    Thomas, Kevin ; Stone, Mark ; Thompson, Kevin ; St Claire Gibson, Alan ; Ansley, Les. / The effect of self-even-and variable-pacing strategies on the physiological and perceptual response to cycling. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 112, No. 8. pp. 3069-3078.
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    The effect of self-even-and variable-pacing strategies on the physiological and perceptual response to cycling. / Thomas, Kevin; Stone, Mark; Thompson, Kevin; St Claire Gibson, Alan; Ansley, Les.

    In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 112, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 3069-3078.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The effect of self-even-and variable-pacing strategies on the physiological and perceptual response to cycling

    AU - Thomas, Kevin

    AU - Stone, Mark

    AU - Thompson, Kevin

    AU - St Claire Gibson, Alan

    AU - Ansley, Les

    PY - 2012/8

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    N2 - It has been proposed that an even-pacing strategy is optimal for events lasting <120 s, but this assertion is not well-established. This study tested the hypothesis that even-paced cycling is less challenging than self- or variable-paced cycling. Ten well-trained male cyclists (VO2max, 4.89 ± 0.32 L min(-1)) completed a self-paced (SP) 20-km time trial followed by time- and work-matched even-paced (EP 100% SP mean power) and variable-paced (VP 142 and 72% SP mean power, 1:1.5 high:low power ratio) trials in a random, counterbalanced order. During all trials expired air and heart rate were analysed throughout, blood lactate was sampled every 4 km, and perceptual responses (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and affect) were assessed every 2 km and post-trial. There were no whole trial statistically significant differences between trials for any of the respiratory variables measured, although there was a trend for higher RER's in VP compared to EP (P = 0.053). Blood lactate was lower in EP compared to VP (P = 0.001) and SP (P = 0.001), and higher in SP compared to VP (P = 0.008). RPE was lower, and affect more positive, in EP compared to both SP and VP (P > 0.05). The results of this study show that, for a time- and work-matched 20-km time trial, an even-paced strategy results in attenuated perturbations in the physiological response and lower perception of effort in comparison to self- and variable-paced strategies.

    AB - It has been proposed that an even-pacing strategy is optimal for events lasting <120 s, but this assertion is not well-established. This study tested the hypothesis that even-paced cycling is less challenging than self- or variable-paced cycling. Ten well-trained male cyclists (VO2max, 4.89 ± 0.32 L min(-1)) completed a self-paced (SP) 20-km time trial followed by time- and work-matched even-paced (EP 100% SP mean power) and variable-paced (VP 142 and 72% SP mean power, 1:1.5 high:low power ratio) trials in a random, counterbalanced order. During all trials expired air and heart rate were analysed throughout, blood lactate was sampled every 4 km, and perceptual responses (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and affect) were assessed every 2 km and post-trial. There were no whole trial statistically significant differences between trials for any of the respiratory variables measured, although there was a trend for higher RER's in VP compared to EP (P = 0.053). Blood lactate was lower in EP compared to VP (P = 0.001) and SP (P = 0.001), and higher in SP compared to VP (P = 0.008). RPE was lower, and affect more positive, in EP compared to both SP and VP (P > 0.05). The results of this study show that, for a time- and work-matched 20-km time trial, an even-paced strategy results in attenuated perturbations in the physiological response and lower perception of effort in comparison to self- and variable-paced strategies.

    KW - Constant RPE

    KW - Cycling

    KW - Intermittent

    KW - Pacing

    KW - Time trial

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    JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology

    JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology

    SN - 1439-6319

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