The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review

Cherie WELLS, Gregory Kolt, Paul Marshall, Bridget Hill, Andrea Bialocerkowski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    42 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources: A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for "Pilates" and "low back pain" within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection: Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis: The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from "poor" to "excellent". A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions: Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise more than others
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere100402
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume9
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2014

    Fingerprint

    back (body region)
    systematic review
    Low Back Pain
    pain
    exercise
    Nursing
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Health
    Physical therapy
    Aptitude
    Sports
    Massage
    Databases
    massage
    Pain
    physical activity
    Exercise Therapy
    Information Storage and Retrieval
    physical therapy
    therapeutics

    Cite this

    WELLS, C., Kolt, G., Marshall, P., Hill, B., & Bialocerkowski, A. (2014). The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review. PLoS One, 9(7), 1-14. [e100402]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100402
    WELLS, Cherie ; Kolt, Gregory ; Marshall, Paul ; Hill, Bridget ; Bialocerkowski, Andrea. / The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 7. pp. 1-14.
    @article{ce9f57ebbce9424dbf5db4af25f0ff05,
    title = "The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review",
    abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources: A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for {"}Pilates{"} and {"}low back pain{"} within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection: Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis: The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from {"}poor{"} to {"}excellent{"}. A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions: Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise more than others",
    keywords = "clinical effectiveness, functional status, human, intermethod comparison, low back pain, massage, methodology, outcome assessment, physical activity, pilates, randomized controlled trial (topic), review, systematic review, treatment duration, Low Back Pain/therapy, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Humans, Exercise Therapy, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Chronic Pain/therapy, Exercise Movement Techniques",
    author = "Cherie WELLS and Gregory Kolt and Paul Marshall and Bridget Hill and Andrea Bialocerkowski",
    year = "2014",
    month = "7",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0100402",
    language = "English",
    volume = "9",
    pages = "1--14",
    journal = "PLoS One",
    issn = "1932-6203",
    publisher = "Public Library of Science",
    number = "7",

    }

    WELLS, C, Kolt, G, Marshall, P, Hill, B & Bialocerkowski, A 2014, 'The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review', PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 7, e100402, pp. 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100402

    The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review. / WELLS, Cherie; Kolt, Gregory; Marshall, Paul; Hill, Bridget; Bialocerkowski, Andrea.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e100402, 01.07.2014, p. 1-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The effectiveness of pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: A systematic review

    AU - WELLS, Cherie

    AU - Kolt, Gregory

    AU - Marshall, Paul

    AU - Hill, Bridget

    AU - Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    PY - 2014/7/1

    Y1 - 2014/7/1

    N2 - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources: A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for "Pilates" and "low back pain" within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection: Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis: The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from "poor" to "excellent". A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions: Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise more than others

    AB - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources: A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for "Pilates" and "low back pain" within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection: Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis: The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from "poor" to "excellent". A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions: Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise more than others

    KW - clinical effectiveness

    KW - functional status

    KW - human

    KW - intermethod comparison

    KW - low back pain

    KW - massage

    KW - methodology

    KW - outcome assessment

    KW - physical activity

    KW - pilates

    KW - randomized controlled trial (topic)

    KW - review

    KW - systematic review

    KW - treatment duration

    KW - Low Back Pain/therapy

    KW - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    KW - Humans

    KW - Exercise Therapy

    KW - Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

    KW - Chronic Pain/therapy

    KW - Exercise Movement Techniques

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903745785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/effectiveness-pilates-exercise-people-chronic-low-back-pain-systematic-review

    U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0100402

    DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0100402

    M3 - Article

    VL - 9

    SP - 1

    EP - 14

    JO - PLoS One

    JF - PLoS One

    SN - 1932-6203

    IS - 7

    M1 - e100402

    ER -