The effects of an L-methionine combination supplement on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and performance in ultramarathon runners before, during and after ultra-endurance exercise

LM Harden, N Neveling, F Rossouw, SJ Semple, FE Marx, J Rossouw, G Rogers

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Abstract

Objective. To evaluate whether supplementation with an L-methionine combination would reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) and improve performance in ultramarathon runners.
Design. A double-blind placebo-controlled study.
Setting. Twenty-one ultramarathon runners (17 males, 4 females) preparing for participation in an 87.3 km ultramarathon.
Interventions. L-methionine combination supplement (L-methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid and magnesium) or placebo containing potato starch.
Main outcome measures. Incidence of URTS was recorded during the runner's preparation for an ultramarathon race (75 days) and recovery from the same (75 days). CD4+, CD8+ cell counts and ratios were measured pre race, immediately post race and 75 days post race. VO2max and endurance fitness (percentage VO2max at 4 mmol-1 lactate concentration) were measured during the preparation for the race.
Results. During the preparation period the incidence of URTS was 36% in the supplement group and 80% in the placebo group (p = 0.08). The incidence of URTS during the 3 weeks post race was 27% in the supplement group and 40% in the placebo group (p = 0.65). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios were not significantly different between groups. Endurance fitness prior to the race and race times were not significantly different.
Conclusions. Although the findings of the current study show that an L-methionine combination supplement did not reduce the incidence of URTS or improve performance in ultramarathon runners, benefits may be found with a more detailed investigation using larger sample sizes and immunosuppressed athletes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalSouth African Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Respiratory Tract Infections
Methionine
Exercise
Respiratory System
Placebos
Incidence
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Vitamin B 6
Vitamin B 12
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Solanum tuberosum
Folic Acid
Athletes
Starch
Sample Size
Magnesium
Lactic Acid
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

@article{daebe8229ca74e0cbf72434b58e86b82,
title = "The effects of an L-methionine combination supplement on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and performance in ultramarathon runners before, during and after ultra-endurance exercise",
abstract = "Objective. To evaluate whether supplementation with an L-methionine combination would reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) and improve performance in ultramarathon runners. Design. A double-blind placebo-controlled study. Setting. Twenty-one ultramarathon runners (17 males, 4 females) preparing for participation in an 87.3 km ultramarathon. Interventions. L-methionine combination supplement (L-methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid and magnesium) or placebo containing potato starch. Main outcome measures. Incidence of URTS was recorded during the runner's preparation for an ultramarathon race (75 days) and recovery from the same (75 days). CD4+, CD8+ cell counts and ratios were measured pre race, immediately post race and 75 days post race. VO2max and endurance fitness (percentage VO2max at 4 mmol-1 lactate concentration) were measured during the preparation for the race.Results. During the preparation period the incidence of URTS was 36{\%} in the supplement group and 80{\%} in the placebo group (p = 0.08). The incidence of URTS during the 3 weeks post race was 27{\%} in the supplement group and 40{\%} in the placebo group (p = 0.65). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios were not significantly different between groups. Endurance fitness prior to the race and race times were not significantly different. Conclusions. Although the findings of the current study show that an L-methionine combination supplement did not reduce the incidence of URTS or improve performance in ultramarathon runners, benefits may be found with a more detailed investigation using larger sample sizes and immunosuppressed athletes.",
author = "LM Harden and N Neveling and F Rossouw and SJ Semple and FE Marx and J Rossouw and G Rogers",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.17159/2078-516X/2004/v16i1a188",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "10--16",
journal = "South African Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "1015-5163",
publisher = "Health and Medical Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of an L-methionine combination supplement on symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and performance in ultramarathon runners before, during and after ultra-endurance exercise

AU - Harden, LM

AU - Neveling, N

AU - Rossouw, F

AU - Semple, SJ

AU - Marx, FE

AU - Rossouw, J

AU - Rogers, G

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Objective. To evaluate whether supplementation with an L-methionine combination would reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) and improve performance in ultramarathon runners. Design. A double-blind placebo-controlled study. Setting. Twenty-one ultramarathon runners (17 males, 4 females) preparing for participation in an 87.3 km ultramarathon. Interventions. L-methionine combination supplement (L-methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid and magnesium) or placebo containing potato starch. Main outcome measures. Incidence of URTS was recorded during the runner's preparation for an ultramarathon race (75 days) and recovery from the same (75 days). CD4+, CD8+ cell counts and ratios were measured pre race, immediately post race and 75 days post race. VO2max and endurance fitness (percentage VO2max at 4 mmol-1 lactate concentration) were measured during the preparation for the race.Results. During the preparation period the incidence of URTS was 36% in the supplement group and 80% in the placebo group (p = 0.08). The incidence of URTS during the 3 weeks post race was 27% in the supplement group and 40% in the placebo group (p = 0.65). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios were not significantly different between groups. Endurance fitness prior to the race and race times were not significantly different. Conclusions. Although the findings of the current study show that an L-methionine combination supplement did not reduce the incidence of URTS or improve performance in ultramarathon runners, benefits may be found with a more detailed investigation using larger sample sizes and immunosuppressed athletes.

AB - Objective. To evaluate whether supplementation with an L-methionine combination would reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) and improve performance in ultramarathon runners. Design. A double-blind placebo-controlled study. Setting. Twenty-one ultramarathon runners (17 males, 4 females) preparing for participation in an 87.3 km ultramarathon. Interventions. L-methionine combination supplement (L-methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid and magnesium) or placebo containing potato starch. Main outcome measures. Incidence of URTS was recorded during the runner's preparation for an ultramarathon race (75 days) and recovery from the same (75 days). CD4+, CD8+ cell counts and ratios were measured pre race, immediately post race and 75 days post race. VO2max and endurance fitness (percentage VO2max at 4 mmol-1 lactate concentration) were measured during the preparation for the race.Results. During the preparation period the incidence of URTS was 36% in the supplement group and 80% in the placebo group (p = 0.08). The incidence of URTS during the 3 weeks post race was 27% in the supplement group and 40% in the placebo group (p = 0.65). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratios were not significantly different between groups. Endurance fitness prior to the race and race times were not significantly different. Conclusions. Although the findings of the current study show that an L-methionine combination supplement did not reduce the incidence of URTS or improve performance in ultramarathon runners, benefits may be found with a more detailed investigation using larger sample sizes and immunosuppressed athletes.

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DO - 10.17159/2078-516X/2004/v16i1a188

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JO - South African Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - South African Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 1015-5163

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