The effects of short-cycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players

Blair T Crewther, C.J. Cook, T.E. Lowe, R.P. Weatherby, Nicholas Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of shortcycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players. Thirty male rugby players performed an upperbody power and lower-body strength (UPLS) and/or a lowerbody power and upper-body strength (LPUS) workout using a crossover design (sprint vs. control). A 40-second upper-body or lower-body cycle sprint was performed before the UPLS and LPUS workouts, respectively, with the control sessions performed without the sprints. Bench throw (BT) power and box squat (BS) 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength were assessed in the UPLS workout, and squat jump (SJ) power and bench press (BP) 1RM strength were assessed in the LPUS workout. Saliva was collected across each workout and assayed for testosterone (Sal-T) and cortisol (Sal-C). The cycle sprints improved BS (2.6 ± 6 1.2%) and BP (2.8 6 ± 1.0%) 1RM but did not affect BT and SJ power. The lower-body cycle sprint produced a favorable environment for the BS by elevating Sal-T concentrations. The upper-body cycle sprint had no hormonal effect, but the workout differences (%) in Sal-T (r = -0.59) and Sal-C (r = 0.42) concentrations correlated to the BP, along with the Sal-T/C ratio (r = -0.49 to -0.66). In conclusion, the cycle sprints improved the BP and BS 1RM strength of elite rugby players but not power output in the current format. The improvements noted may be explained, in part, by the changes in absolute or relative hormone concentrations. These findings have practical implications for prescribing warm-up and training exercises. © 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-39
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Football
Hormones
Hydrocortisone
Warm-Up Exercise
Saliva
Cross-Over Studies
Testosterone

Cite this

Crewther, Blair T ; Cook, C.J. ; Lowe, T.E. ; Weatherby, R.P. ; Gill, Nicholas. / The effects of short-cycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 32-39.
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The effects of short-cycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players. / Crewther, Blair T; Cook, C.J.; Lowe, T.E.; Weatherby, R.P.; Gill, Nicholas.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 25, No. 1, 2011, p. 32-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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