The first tetrapod remains from the Upper Jurassic Talbragar Fossil Fish Bed

Lachlan J. Hart, Matthew R. McCurry, Michael Frese, Thomas J. Peachey, Jochen Brocks

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A single tetrapod tooth has been recovered from the Upper Jurassic Talbragar Fossil Fish Bed of New South Wales, Australia. It is the first evidence of a tetrapod to have been found at this locality in over 130 years of excavation. The tooth is likely from a temnospondyl amphibian. Herein, we document the discovery, discuss the potential explanations as to why tetrapod remains are so scarce from this locality and provide hypotheses as to how this tooth came to be preserved. Lachlan J. Hart [L.Hart@unsw.edu.au], Earth and Sustainability Science Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales 2052, Australia; Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Matthew R. McCurry [Matthew.McCurry@Australian.Museum], Earth and Sustainability Science Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales 2052, Australia; Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA; Michael Frese [Michael.Frese@canberra.edu.au], Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia; Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Thomas J. Peachey [Thomas.Peachey@Australian.Museum], Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Jochen Brocks [Jochen.Brocks@anu.edu.au], Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-428
Number of pages6
JournalAlcheringa
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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