The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements

Dempsey Hsiu-Ju Chang, Keith Nesbitt, Kevin Wilkins

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The multi-sensory display of abstract data is a new and emerging area of study in the area of computer interfaces. Unfortunately the design of multi-sensory displays is complex and it is necessary to carefully consider the perceptual capabilities of humans. Therefore we aim to both collect useful guidelines that help designers of multi-sensory displays and to structure these guidelines by using appropriate high-level principles. Gestalt principles suggest themselves as one possible framework for structuring multi-sensory design guidelines. Gestalt theory explains how humans organise individual elements into groups and how humans perceive and recognise patterns. Unfortunately very little work has been done in evaluating how well these principles apply to the haptic sense. This paper focuses on how individuals use the sense of haptic (touch) to group display elements using the gestalt principle of continuation. The hypothesis of the experiment is that people used their haptic perceptions to group display elements in the same way they group elements visually. Overall we find this hypothesis to be true and that a significant number of subjects group haptic elements so that they can be interpreted as continuous lines and forms. This supports our hypothesis that the gestalt principle of continuation is applicable for both visual and haptic grouping and therefore provides a useful principle for structuring multi-sensory design guidelines.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems
    EditorsS Kawada
    Place of PublicationJapan
    PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    Pages15-20
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)9780769527383
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    EventWorld Haptics 2007 - Tsukuba, Japan
    Duration: 22 Mar 200724 Mar 2007

    Conference

    ConferenceWorld Haptics 2007
    CountryJapan
    CityTsukuba
    Period22/03/0724/03/07

    Fingerprint

    Display devices
    Interfaces (computer)
    Experiments

    Cite this

    Chang, D. H-J., Nesbitt, K., & Wilkins, K. (2007). The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements. In S. Kawada (Ed.), Proceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems (pp. 15-20). Japan: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.113
    Chang, Dempsey Hsiu-Ju ; Nesbitt, Keith ; Wilkins, Kevin . / The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements. Proceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. editor / S Kawada. Japan : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2007. pp. 15-20
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    Chang, DH-J, Nesbitt, K & Wilkins, K 2007, The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements. in S Kawada (ed.), Proceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Japan, pp. 15-20, World Haptics 2007, Tsukuba, Japan, 22/03/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.113

    The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements. / Chang, Dempsey Hsiu-Ju; Nesbitt, Keith; Wilkins, Kevin .

    Proceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. ed. / S Kawada. Japan : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2007. p. 15-20.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    Chang DH-J, Nesbitt K, Wilkins K. The Gestalt principle of continuation applies to both the haptic and visual grouping of elements. In Kawada S, editor, Proceedings of the Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. Japan: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2007. p. 15-20 https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.113