The HRM Function in Australia: Supports and Barriers to Strategic HRM Integration

Peter Dowling, Cathy Sheehan

    Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

    Abstract

    The transition from personnel management to Human Resource Management (HRM) has activated considerable discussion and debate within the academic literature about the strategic positioning of, and responsibility for, HRM activity (Beer, 1997; Dyer & Holder, 1988; Guest 1987; 1989). Specifically, effective HRM integration involves active HR representation in strategic decision-making processes, HR policies that cohere and the acceptance of HRM responsibilities by line managers and employees as part of their everyday life (Schuler, 1992). Despite the evidence that there has been some shift towards this goal, there is good reason to believe that the HR function is yet to make the full transition from administrator to strategic partner (Johnson, 2000; Kochan & Dyer, 2001; Storey, 2001;). In an environment where core competencies and competitive advantage are being increasingly linked to effective HRM activity (Boxall & Purcell, 2000), it is critical that barriers to the full realisation of HRM integration be understood and investigated.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages1-374
    Number of pages374
    Publication statusPublished - 2003
    Event7th Conference on International Human Resource Management - Limerick, Ireland
    Duration: 4 Jun 20036 Jun 2003

    Conference

    Conference7th Conference on International Human Resource Management
    CountryIreland
    CityLimerick
    Period4/06/036/06/03

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