The impact of match-play tennis in a hot environment on indirect markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status

Wade L. Knez, J D Périard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of changes in oxidative stress and antioxidant status in response to playing tennis in HOT (∼36°C and 35% relative humidity (RH)) and COOL (∼22°C and 70% RH) conditions.

METHODS: 10 male tennis players undertook two matches for an effective playing time (ie, ball in play) of 20 min, corresponding to ∼122 and ∼107 min of total play in HOT and COOL conditions, respectively. Core body temperature, body mass and indirect markers of oxidative stress (diacrons reactive oxygen metabolic test) and antioxidant status (biological antioxidant potential test) were assessed immediately prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h into recovery.

RESULTS: Regardless of the condition, oxidative stress remained similar throughout play and into recovery. Likewise, match-play tennis in the COOL had no impact on antioxidant status. However, antioxidants status increased significantly in the HOT compared with COOL environment (p<0.05). Body mass losses (∼0.5 kg) were similar between conditions. Rectal temperature increased during both matches (p<0.05), but with a greater magnitude in the HOT (39.3±0.5°C) versus COOL (38.7±0.2°C) environment (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Match-play tennis in the heat does not exacerbate the development of oxidative stress, but significantly increases antioxidant status. These data suggest that the heat stress observed in the HOT environment may provide a necessary signal for the upregulation of antioxidant defence, dampening cellular damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)i59-63
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume48
Issue numberSuppl 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Tennis
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Humidity
Hot Temperature
Body Temperature
Up-Regulation
Oxygen
Temperature

Cite this

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title = "The impact of match-play tennis in a hot environment on indirect markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of changes in oxidative stress and antioxidant status in response to playing tennis in HOT (∼36°C and 35{\%} relative humidity (RH)) and COOL (∼22°C and 70{\%} RH) conditions.METHODS: 10 male tennis players undertook two matches for an effective playing time (ie, ball in play) of 20 min, corresponding to ∼122 and ∼107 min of total play in HOT and COOL conditions, respectively. Core body temperature, body mass and indirect markers of oxidative stress (diacrons reactive oxygen metabolic test) and antioxidant status (biological antioxidant potential test) were assessed immediately prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h into recovery.RESULTS: Regardless of the condition, oxidative stress remained similar throughout play and into recovery. Likewise, match-play tennis in the COOL had no impact on antioxidant status. However, antioxidants status increased significantly in the HOT compared with COOL environment (p<0.05). Body mass losses (∼0.5 kg) were similar between conditions. Rectal temperature increased during both matches (p<0.05), but with a greater magnitude in the HOT (39.3±0.5°C) versus COOL (38.7±0.2°C) environment (p<0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Match-play tennis in the heat does not exacerbate the development of oxidative stress, but significantly increases antioxidant status. These data suggest that the heat stress observed in the HOT environment may provide a necessary signal for the upregulation of antioxidant defence, dampening cellular damage.",
keywords = "Antioxidants, Biomarkers, Body Temperature, Cold Temperature, Hot Temperature, Humans, Male, Oxidative Stress, Sweating, Tennis, Water-Electrolyte Balance, Young Adult, Journal Article",
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The impact of match-play tennis in a hot environment on indirect markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status. / Knez, Wade L.; Périard, J D.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. Suppl 1, 04.2014, p. i59-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of match-play tennis in a hot environment on indirect markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status

AU - Knez, Wade L.

AU - Périard, J D

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of changes in oxidative stress and antioxidant status in response to playing tennis in HOT (∼36°C and 35% relative humidity (RH)) and COOL (∼22°C and 70% RH) conditions.METHODS: 10 male tennis players undertook two matches for an effective playing time (ie, ball in play) of 20 min, corresponding to ∼122 and ∼107 min of total play in HOT and COOL conditions, respectively. Core body temperature, body mass and indirect markers of oxidative stress (diacrons reactive oxygen metabolic test) and antioxidant status (biological antioxidant potential test) were assessed immediately prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h into recovery.RESULTS: Regardless of the condition, oxidative stress remained similar throughout play and into recovery. Likewise, match-play tennis in the COOL had no impact on antioxidant status. However, antioxidants status increased significantly in the HOT compared with COOL environment (p<0.05). Body mass losses (∼0.5 kg) were similar between conditions. Rectal temperature increased during both matches (p<0.05), but with a greater magnitude in the HOT (39.3±0.5°C) versus COOL (38.7±0.2°C) environment (p<0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Match-play tennis in the heat does not exacerbate the development of oxidative stress, but significantly increases antioxidant status. These data suggest that the heat stress observed in the HOT environment may provide a necessary signal for the upregulation of antioxidant defence, dampening cellular damage.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of changes in oxidative stress and antioxidant status in response to playing tennis in HOT (∼36°C and 35% relative humidity (RH)) and COOL (∼22°C and 70% RH) conditions.METHODS: 10 male tennis players undertook two matches for an effective playing time (ie, ball in play) of 20 min, corresponding to ∼122 and ∼107 min of total play in HOT and COOL conditions, respectively. Core body temperature, body mass and indirect markers of oxidative stress (diacrons reactive oxygen metabolic test) and antioxidant status (biological antioxidant potential test) were assessed immediately prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h into recovery.RESULTS: Regardless of the condition, oxidative stress remained similar throughout play and into recovery. Likewise, match-play tennis in the COOL had no impact on antioxidant status. However, antioxidants status increased significantly in the HOT compared with COOL environment (p<0.05). Body mass losses (∼0.5 kg) were similar between conditions. Rectal temperature increased during both matches (p<0.05), but with a greater magnitude in the HOT (39.3±0.5°C) versus COOL (38.7±0.2°C) environment (p<0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Match-play tennis in the heat does not exacerbate the development of oxidative stress, but significantly increases antioxidant status. These data suggest that the heat stress observed in the HOT environment may provide a necessary signal for the upregulation of antioxidant defence, dampening cellular damage.

KW - Antioxidants

KW - Biomarkers

KW - Body Temperature

KW - Cold Temperature

KW - Hot Temperature

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Oxidative Stress

KW - Sweating

KW - Tennis

KW - Water-Electrolyte Balance

KW - Young Adult

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093248

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093248

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - i59-63

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

IS - Suppl 1

ER -