The impact of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on recovery after intensive, muscle damaging, maximal speed training in professional team sports players

T. Taylor, D.J. West, G Howatson, Christopher Jones, Richard M Bracken, T.D. Love, C.J. Cook, Eamon Swift, J.S. Baker, Liam P Kilduff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: During congested fixture periods in team sports, limited recovery time and increased travel hinder the implementation of many recovery strategies; thus alternative methods are required. We examined the impact of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device on 24-h recovery from an intensive training session in professional players. Design: Twenty-eight professional rugby and football academy players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study, on 2 occasions, separated by 7 days. Methods: After baseline perceived soreness, blood (lactate and creatine kinase) and saliva (testosterone and cortisol) samples were collected, players completed a standardised warm-up and baseline countermovement jumps (jump height). Players then completed 60. m. ×. 50. m maximal sprints, with 5. min recovery between efforts. After completing the sprint session, players wore a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device or remained in normal attire (CON) for 8. h. All measures were repeated immediately, 2 and 24-h post-sprint. Results: Player jump height was reduced from baseline at all time points under both conditions; however, at 24-h neuromuscular electrical stimulation was significantly more recovered (mean. ±. SD; neuromuscular electrical stimulation -3.2. ±. 3.2 vs. CON -7.2. ±. 3.7%; P. 0.05). Conclusions: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves recovery from intensive training in professional team sports players. This strategy offers an easily applied recovery strategy which may have particular application during sleep and travel. © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-332
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Electric Stimulation
Sports
Muscles
Football
Equipment and Supplies
Sports Medicine
Creatine Kinase
Saliva
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
Lactic Acid
Sleep

Cite this

Taylor, T. ; West, D.J. ; Howatson, G ; Jones, Christopher ; Bracken, Richard M ; Love, T.D. ; Cook, C.J. ; Swift, Eamon ; Baker, J.S. ; Kilduff, Liam P. / The impact of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on recovery after intensive, muscle damaging, maximal speed training in professional team sports players. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 328-332.
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The impact of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on recovery after intensive, muscle damaging, maximal speed training in professional team sports players. / Taylor, T.; West, D.J.; Howatson, G; Jones, Christopher; Bracken, Richard M; Love, T.D.; Cook, C.J.; Swift, Eamon; Baker, J.S.; Kilduff, Liam P.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2015, p. 328-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Taylor, T.

AU - West, D.J.

AU - Howatson, G

AU - Jones, Christopher

AU - Bracken, Richard M

AU - Love, T.D.

AU - Cook, C.J.

AU - Swift, Eamon

AU - Baker, J.S.

AU - Kilduff, Liam P

N1 - Cited By :2 Export Date: 25 May 2017

PY - 2015

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N2 - Objectives: During congested fixture periods in team sports, limited recovery time and increased travel hinder the implementation of many recovery strategies; thus alternative methods are required. We examined the impact of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device on 24-h recovery from an intensive training session in professional players. Design: Twenty-eight professional rugby and football academy players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study, on 2 occasions, separated by 7 days. Methods: After baseline perceived soreness, blood (lactate and creatine kinase) and saliva (testosterone and cortisol) samples were collected, players completed a standardised warm-up and baseline countermovement jumps (jump height). Players then completed 60. m. ×. 50. m maximal sprints, with 5. min recovery between efforts. After completing the sprint session, players wore a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device or remained in normal attire (CON) for 8. h. All measures were repeated immediately, 2 and 24-h post-sprint. Results: Player jump height was reduced from baseline at all time points under both conditions; however, at 24-h neuromuscular electrical stimulation was significantly more recovered (mean. ±. SD; neuromuscular electrical stimulation -3.2. ±. 3.2 vs. CON -7.2. ±. 3.7%; P. 0.05). Conclusions: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves recovery from intensive training in professional team sports players. This strategy offers an easily applied recovery strategy which may have particular application during sleep and travel. © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia.

AB - Objectives: During congested fixture periods in team sports, limited recovery time and increased travel hinder the implementation of many recovery strategies; thus alternative methods are required. We examined the impact of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device on 24-h recovery from an intensive training session in professional players. Design: Twenty-eight professional rugby and football academy players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study, on 2 occasions, separated by 7 days. Methods: After baseline perceived soreness, blood (lactate and creatine kinase) and saliva (testosterone and cortisol) samples were collected, players completed a standardised warm-up and baseline countermovement jumps (jump height). Players then completed 60. m. ×. 50. m maximal sprints, with 5. min recovery between efforts. After completing the sprint session, players wore a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device or remained in normal attire (CON) for 8. h. All measures were repeated immediately, 2 and 24-h post-sprint. Results: Player jump height was reduced from baseline at all time points under both conditions; however, at 24-h neuromuscular electrical stimulation was significantly more recovered (mean. ±. SD; neuromuscular electrical stimulation -3.2. ±. 3.2 vs. CON -7.2. ±. 3.7%; P. 0.05). Conclusions: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves recovery from intensive training in professional team sports players. This strategy offers an easily applied recovery strategy which may have particular application during sleep and travel. © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia.

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