The influence of sport club participation on physical activity, fitness and body fat during childhood and adolescence: The LOOK Longitudinal Study

Rohan Telford, Richard Telford, Tom COCHRANE, Ross Cunningham, Lisa Olive, Rachel DAVEY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To investigate the longitudinal effect of sport participation in physical activity, fitness and body fat changes during childhood and adolescence. Design Longitudinal study (134 boys, 155 girls) of Australian youth aged 8–16 years. Methods Physical activity was assessed by pedometers and accelerometers, fitness by the 20 m shuttle-run, body fat by DEXA and club sport participation by questionnaire. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of sport participation and gender differences. Results Sports club participants were more physically active at all age groups than non-participants; boys took an extra 1800 steps (p < 0.001) and girls 590 steps per day (p < 0.01) and boys engaged in an extra 9 min and girls 6 min more moderate to vigorous PA per day (both p < 0.05). Fitness was higher among sports participants (boys 27% and girls 20% higher, both p < 0.001) and sport participant girls had 2.9% less body fat (p < 0.05). Higher fitness scores were maintained over time by sports participants but their greater PA diminished during adolescence, this being more evident among girls. Only 20% of sports club participants met the recommended daily average of 60 min MVPA. Conclusions Sport participants were more active, fitter and had less body fat (girls only) than non-sports participants. However, the associated benefits of sport with PA diminished during adolescence and the majority of sports participants did not meet recommended levels of PA. Strategies aiming to maximise the benefits of sports participation may be enhanced by providing special attention to the early adolescent period particularly among girls
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)400-406
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Sports
Longitudinal Studies
Adipose Tissue
Exercise
Linear Models
Age Groups

Cite this

@article{97fa010f8792480d9e059e2ac3b0279d,
title = "The influence of sport club participation on physical activity, fitness and body fat during childhood and adolescence: The LOOK Longitudinal Study",
abstract = "Objectives To investigate the longitudinal effect of sport participation in physical activity, fitness and body fat changes during childhood and adolescence. Design Longitudinal study (134 boys, 155 girls) of Australian youth aged 8–16 years. Methods Physical activity was assessed by pedometers and accelerometers, fitness by the 20 m shuttle-run, body fat by DEXA and club sport participation by questionnaire. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of sport participation and gender differences. Results Sports club participants were more physically active at all age groups than non-participants; boys took an extra 1800 steps (p < 0.001) and girls 590 steps per day (p < 0.01) and boys engaged in an extra 9 min and girls 6 min more moderate to vigorous PA per day (both p < 0.05). Fitness was higher among sports participants (boys 27{\%} and girls 20{\%} higher, both p < 0.001) and sport participant girls had 2.9{\%} less body fat (p < 0.05). Higher fitness scores were maintained over time by sports participants but their greater PA diminished during adolescence, this being more evident among girls. Only 20{\%} of sports club participants met the recommended daily average of 60 min MVPA. Conclusions Sport participants were more active, fitter and had less body fat (girls only) than non-sports participants. However, the associated benefits of sport with PA diminished during adolescence and the majority of sports participants did not meet recommended levels of PA. Strategies aiming to maximise the benefits of sports participation may be enhanced by providing special attention to the early adolescent period particularly among girls",
author = "Rohan Telford and Richard Telford and Tom COCHRANE and Ross Cunningham and Lisa Olive and Rachel DAVEY",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.008",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "400--406",
journal = "Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

The influence of sport club participation on physical activity, fitness and body fat during childhood and adolescence: The LOOK Longitudinal Study. / Telford, Rohan; Telford, Richard; COCHRANE, Tom; Cunningham, Ross; Olive, Lisa; DAVEY, Rachel.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 19, 2016, p. 400-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of sport club participation on physical activity, fitness and body fat during childhood and adolescence: The LOOK Longitudinal Study

AU - Telford, Rohan

AU - Telford, Richard

AU - COCHRANE, Tom

AU - Cunningham, Ross

AU - Olive, Lisa

AU - DAVEY, Rachel

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Objectives To investigate the longitudinal effect of sport participation in physical activity, fitness and body fat changes during childhood and adolescence. Design Longitudinal study (134 boys, 155 girls) of Australian youth aged 8–16 years. Methods Physical activity was assessed by pedometers and accelerometers, fitness by the 20 m shuttle-run, body fat by DEXA and club sport participation by questionnaire. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of sport participation and gender differences. Results Sports club participants were more physically active at all age groups than non-participants; boys took an extra 1800 steps (p < 0.001) and girls 590 steps per day (p < 0.01) and boys engaged in an extra 9 min and girls 6 min more moderate to vigorous PA per day (both p < 0.05). Fitness was higher among sports participants (boys 27% and girls 20% higher, both p < 0.001) and sport participant girls had 2.9% less body fat (p < 0.05). Higher fitness scores were maintained over time by sports participants but their greater PA diminished during adolescence, this being more evident among girls. Only 20% of sports club participants met the recommended daily average of 60 min MVPA. Conclusions Sport participants were more active, fitter and had less body fat (girls only) than non-sports participants. However, the associated benefits of sport with PA diminished during adolescence and the majority of sports participants did not meet recommended levels of PA. Strategies aiming to maximise the benefits of sports participation may be enhanced by providing special attention to the early adolescent period particularly among girls

AB - Objectives To investigate the longitudinal effect of sport participation in physical activity, fitness and body fat changes during childhood and adolescence. Design Longitudinal study (134 boys, 155 girls) of Australian youth aged 8–16 years. Methods Physical activity was assessed by pedometers and accelerometers, fitness by the 20 m shuttle-run, body fat by DEXA and club sport participation by questionnaire. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effects of sport participation and gender differences. Results Sports club participants were more physically active at all age groups than non-participants; boys took an extra 1800 steps (p < 0.001) and girls 590 steps per day (p < 0.01) and boys engaged in an extra 9 min and girls 6 min more moderate to vigorous PA per day (both p < 0.05). Fitness was higher among sports participants (boys 27% and girls 20% higher, both p < 0.001) and sport participant girls had 2.9% less body fat (p < 0.05). Higher fitness scores were maintained over time by sports participants but their greater PA diminished during adolescence, this being more evident among girls. Only 20% of sports club participants met the recommended daily average of 60 min MVPA. Conclusions Sport participants were more active, fitter and had less body fat (girls only) than non-sports participants. However, the associated benefits of sport with PA diminished during adolescence and the majority of sports participants did not meet recommended levels of PA. Strategies aiming to maximise the benefits of sports participation may be enhanced by providing special attention to the early adolescent period particularly among girls

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.008

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.008

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 400

EP - 406

JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

ER -