The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands

T MacKinstosh, Ross THOMPSON

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The construction of wetlands in urban environments is primarily carried out to assist in the removal of contaminants from wastewaters; however, these wetlands have the added benefit of providing habitat for aquatic invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. Stormwater quantity and quality is directly related to impervious area (roads, sealed areas, roofs) in the catchment. As a consequence, it would be expected that impervious area would be related to contaminant load and biodiversity in receiving waters such as urban wetlands. This study aimed to establish whether the degree of urbanisation and its associated changes to stormwater runoff affected macroinvertebrate richness and abundance within constructed wetlands. Urban wetlands in Melbourne's west and south east were sampled along a gradient of urbanisation. There was a significant negative relationship between total imperviousness (TI) and the abundance of aquatic invertebrates detected for sites in the west, but not in the south east. However macroinvertebrate communities were relatively homogenous both within and between all study wetlands. Chironomidae (non-biting midges) was the most abundant family recorded at the majority of sites. Chironomids are able to tolerate a wide array of environmental conditions, including eutrophic and anoxic conditions. Their prevalence suggests that water quality is impaired in these systems, regardless of degree of urbanisation, although the causal mechanism is unclear. These results show some dependency between receiving wetland condition and the degree of urbanisation of the catchment, but suggest that other factors may be as important in determining the value of urban wetlands as habitat for wildlife.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)527-537
    Number of pages11
    JournalScience of the Total Environment
    Volume536
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Biodiversity
    Wetlands
    stormwater
    macroinvertebrate
    urbanization
    wetland
    biodiversity
    Catchments
    invertebrate
    catchment
    Impurities
    pollutant
    habitat
    constructed wetland
    anoxic conditions
    roof
    Runoff
    Roofs
    Fish
    Water quality

    Cite this

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    title = "The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands",
    abstract = "The construction of wetlands in urban environments is primarily carried out to assist in the removal of contaminants from wastewaters; however, these wetlands have the added benefit of providing habitat for aquatic invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. Stormwater quantity and quality is directly related to impervious area (roads, sealed areas, roofs) in the catchment. As a consequence, it would be expected that impervious area would be related to contaminant load and biodiversity in receiving waters such as urban wetlands. This study aimed to establish whether the degree of urbanisation and its associated changes to stormwater runoff affected macroinvertebrate richness and abundance within constructed wetlands. Urban wetlands in Melbourne's west and south east were sampled along a gradient of urbanisation. There was a significant negative relationship between total imperviousness (TI) and the abundance of aquatic invertebrates detected for sites in the west, but not in the south east. However macroinvertebrate communities were relatively homogenous both within and between all study wetlands. Chironomidae (non-biting midges) was the most abundant family recorded at the majority of sites. Chironomids are able to tolerate a wide array of environmental conditions, including eutrophic and anoxic conditions. Their prevalence suggests that water quality is impaired in these systems, regardless of degree of urbanisation, although the causal mechanism is unclear. These results show some dependency between receiving wetland condition and the degree of urbanisation of the catchment, but suggest that other factors may be as important in determining the value of urban wetlands as habitat for wildlife.",
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    The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands. / MacKinstosh, T; THOMPSON, Ross.

    In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 536, 2015, p. 527-537.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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