The kinematic differences between skill levels in the squash forehand drive, volley and drop strokes

Benjamin K. Williams, Ross H. Sanders, Joong Hyun Ryu, Philip Graham-Smith, Peter J. Sinclair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Knowledge of the kinematic differences that separate highly skilled and less-skilled squash players could assist the progression of talent development. This study compared trunk, upper-limb and racket kinematics between two groups of nine highly skilled and less-skilled male athletes for forehand drive, volley and drop strokes. A 15-camera motion analysis system recorded three-dimensional trajectories, with five shots analysed per participant per stroke. The highly skilled group had significantly (p< 0.05) larger forearm pronation/supination range-of-motion and wrist extension angles at impact than the less-skilled. The less-skilled group had a significantly more "open" racket face and slower racket velocities at impact than the highly skilled. Rates of shoulder internal rotation, forearm pronation, elbow extension and wrist flexion at impact were greater in the drive stroke than in the other strokes. The position of the racket at impact in the volley was significantly more anterior to the shoulder than in the other strokes, with a smaller trunk rotation angular velocity. Players used less shoulder internal/external rotation, forearm pronation/supination, elbow and wrist flexion/extension ranges-of-motions and angular velocities at impact in the drop stroke than in the other strokes. These findings provide useful insights into the technical differences that separate highly skilled from less-skilled players and provide a kinematic distinction between stroke types.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1550-1559
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume38
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jul 2020

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