The newsworthiness of suicide

Jane Pirkis, Philip Burgess, Warwick Blood, Catherine Francis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is a paucity of studies examining which suicides are considered news-worthy. By combining data on media reports of individuals' suicides with routinely collected suicide data, it was found that 1% of Australian suicides were reported over a 1-year period. There was evidence of over-reporting of suicides by older people and females, and those involving dramatic methods. Reported suicides fell into three groups: suicides reported in a broader context; suicides by celebrities; and suicides involving unusual circumstances/methods. The data suggest a need for media professionals and suicide experts to work together to balance newsworthiness against the risk of copycat behavior
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)278-283
    Number of pages6
    JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
    Volume37
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    Cite this

    Pirkis, J., Burgess, P., Blood, W., & Francis, C. (2007). The newsworthiness of suicide. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 37(3), 278-283. https://doi.org/10.1521/suli.2007.37.3.278
    Pirkis, Jane ; Burgess, Philip ; Blood, Warwick ; Francis, Catherine. / The newsworthiness of suicide. In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. 2007 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 278-283.
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    Pirkis, J, Burgess, P, Blood, W & Francis, C 2007, 'The newsworthiness of suicide', Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 278-283. https://doi.org/10.1521/suli.2007.37.3.278

    The newsworthiness of suicide. / Pirkis, Jane; Burgess, Philip; Blood, Warwick; Francis, Catherine.

    In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2007, p. 278-283.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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