The perceived importance and the presence of creative potential in the health professional's work environment

Sue Lukersmith, Robin Burgess-Limerick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The value of creative employees to an organisation's growth and innovative development, productivity, quality and sustainability is well established. This study examined the perceived relationship between creativity and work environment factors of 361 practicing health professionals, and whether these factors were present (realised) in their work environment. Job design (challenges, team work, task rotation, autonomy) and leadership (coaching supervisor, time for thinking, creative goals, recognition and incentives for creative ideas and results) were perceived as the most important factors for stimulating creativity. There was room for improvement of these in the work environment. Many aspects of the physical work environment were less important. Public health sector employers and organisations should adopt sustainable strategies which target the important work environment factors to support employee creativity and so enhance service quality, productivity, performance and growth. Implications of the results for ergonomists and workplace managers are discussed with a participatory ergonomics approach recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)922-934
Number of pages13
JournalErgonomics
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event44th Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2008, HFESA 2008 - Adelaide, SA, Australia
Duration: 17 Nov 200819 Nov 2008

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