The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains

James ROBERTSON

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

As recently as 5 years ago the answer to the question posed in the title of this chapter, ‘the role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains’ would, at least in the case of the Australian Federal Police (AFP), have been an easy question to answer: almost no role! Since the first Bali bombing in October 2002 the AFP has come of age in the world of disaster victim identification (DVI) through its involvement in a number of bombing incidents; through its overseas assistance to a number of countries in the South Pacific; and, through its role in responding to the December 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. In this chapter I will consider the work of the AFP in the above incidents, our pathway of learning, and how we are trying to make a difference by building capacity with our regional colleagues and partners. It would be presumptuous to say that the AFP experience is unique or that it is an international benchmark but there will be undoubted parallels with the experience of others and, I am certain, common themes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationForensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse
EditorsMarc Oxenham
Place of PublicationSydney, Australia
PublisherAustralian Academic Press
Chapter17
Pages263-288
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)9781875378906
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

federal police
law enforcement
international law
human being
incident
overseas
disaster
experience
assistance
learning

Cite this

ROBERTSON, J. (2008). The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains. In M. Oxenham (Ed.), Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse (pp. 263-288). Sydney, Australia: Australian Academic Press.
ROBERTSON, James. / The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains. Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse. editor / Marc Oxenham. Sydney, Australia : Australian Academic Press, 2008. pp. 263-288
@inbook{b620e24ddf894795836b56e90acd3cc9,
title = "The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains",
abstract = "As recently as 5 years ago the answer to the question posed in the title of this chapter, ‘the role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains’ would, at least in the case of the Australian Federal Police (AFP), have been an easy question to answer: almost no role! Since the first Bali bombing in October 2002 the AFP has come of age in the world of disaster victim identification (DVI) through its involvement in a number of bombing incidents; through its overseas assistance to a number of countries in the South Pacific; and, through its role in responding to the December 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. In this chapter I will consider the work of the AFP in the above incidents, our pathway of learning, and how we are trying to make a difference by building capacity with our regional colleagues and partners. It would be presumptuous to say that the AFP experience is unique or that it is an international benchmark but there will be undoubted parallels with the experience of others and, I am certain, common themes.",
keywords = "DVI, disaster management, law enforcement role,",
author = "James ROBERTSON",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781875378906",
pages = "263--288",
editor = "Marc Oxenham",
booktitle = "Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse",
publisher = "Australian Academic Press",
address = "Australia",

}

ROBERTSON, J 2008, The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains. in M Oxenham (ed.), Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse. Australian Academic Press, Sydney, Australia, pp. 263-288.

The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains. / ROBERTSON, James.

Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse. ed. / Marc Oxenham. Sydney, Australia : Australian Academic Press, 2008. p. 263-288.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains

AU - ROBERTSON, James

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - As recently as 5 years ago the answer to the question posed in the title of this chapter, ‘the role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains’ would, at least in the case of the Australian Federal Police (AFP), have been an easy question to answer: almost no role! Since the first Bali bombing in October 2002 the AFP has come of age in the world of disaster victim identification (DVI) through its involvement in a number of bombing incidents; through its overseas assistance to a number of countries in the South Pacific; and, through its role in responding to the December 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. In this chapter I will consider the work of the AFP in the above incidents, our pathway of learning, and how we are trying to make a difference by building capacity with our regional colleagues and partners. It would be presumptuous to say that the AFP experience is unique or that it is an international benchmark but there will be undoubted parallels with the experience of others and, I am certain, common themes.

AB - As recently as 5 years ago the answer to the question posed in the title of this chapter, ‘the role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains’ would, at least in the case of the Australian Federal Police (AFP), have been an easy question to answer: almost no role! Since the first Bali bombing in October 2002 the AFP has come of age in the world of disaster victim identification (DVI) through its involvement in a number of bombing incidents; through its overseas assistance to a number of countries in the South Pacific; and, through its role in responding to the December 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. In this chapter I will consider the work of the AFP in the above incidents, our pathway of learning, and how we are trying to make a difference by building capacity with our regional colleagues and partners. It would be presumptuous to say that the AFP experience is unique or that it is an international benchmark but there will be undoubted parallels with the experience of others and, I am certain, common themes.

KW - DVI, disaster management, law enforcement role,

UR - https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/26388832?selectedversion=NBD42975782

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781875378906

SP - 263

EP - 288

BT - Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse

A2 - Oxenham, Marc

PB - Australian Academic Press

CY - Sydney, Australia

ER -

ROBERTSON J. The role of an international law enforcement agency in the identification of deceased persons and remains. In Oxenham M, editor, Forensic Approaches to death, Disaster and Abuse. Sydney, Australia: Australian Academic Press. 2008. p. 263-288