The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

Workplace bullying affects both organizations and individuals. At the individual level, workplace bullying affects the safety, welfare, and health of employees. Studies have found that targets (i.e. individuals who are bullied) reported higher levels of anxiety and depression (Namie, 2003) than did non-bullied workers. Individuals who are persistently bullied for an extended period of time also exhibited symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who are not bullied but are witnesses to such aggression reported higher levels of stress and lower work satisfaction than individuals who were not witnesses (Lutgen-Sandvik et al., 2007). At the organizational level, workplace bullying results in reduced productivity, low morale, high absenteeism, escalating staff turnover, and costly workers compensation claims or legal actions (Einarsen and Mikkelsen, 2003; McCarthy and Mayhew, 2004; Zapf and Einarsen, 2001; Zapf et al., 2003). Workplace bullying can also lead to adverse publicity for a company and/or affect the company’s public image (Bassman, 1992). As a consequence, workplace bullying is increasingly being recognized as an important workplace issue by researchers, managers, human resource (HR) departments, and HR professionals
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBullying in the Workplace
Subtitle of host publicationCauses, Symptoms, and Remedies
EditorsJohn Lipinski, Laura M. Crothers
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter16
Pages255-270
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780203798638
ISBN (Print)9781848729612, 9781848729629
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bullying
Workplace
Morale
Workers' Compensation
Absenteeism
Job Satisfaction
Occupational Health
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Aggression
Anxiety
Research Personnel
Organizations
Depression
Efficiency
Safety

Cite this

Loh, J. (2014). The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior. In J. Lipinski, & L. M. Crothers (Eds.), Bullying in the Workplace: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies (pp. 255-270). Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203798638
Loh, Jennifer. / The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior. Bullying in the Workplace: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies. editor / John Lipinski ; Laura M. Crothers. Taylor & Francis, 2014. pp. 255-270
@inbook{ecf96a8d2e444c8f8d6b251bf93f23ac,
title = "The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior",
abstract = "Workplace bullying affects both organizations and individuals. At the individual level, workplace bullying affects the safety, welfare, and health of employees. Studies have found that targets (i.e. individuals who are bullied) reported higher levels of anxiety and depression (Namie, 2003) than did non-bullied workers. Individuals who are persistently bullied for an extended period of time also exhibited symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who are not bullied but are witnesses to such aggression reported higher levels of stress and lower work satisfaction than individuals who were not witnesses (Lutgen-Sandvik et al., 2007). At the organizational level, workplace bullying results in reduced productivity, low morale, high absenteeism, escalating staff turnover, and costly workers compensation claims or legal actions (Einarsen and Mikkelsen, 2003; McCarthy and Mayhew, 2004; Zapf and Einarsen, 2001; Zapf et al., 2003). Workplace bullying can also lead to adverse publicity for a company and/or affect the company’s public image (Bassman, 1992). As a consequence, workplace bullying is increasingly being recognized as an important workplace issue by researchers, managers, human resource (HR) departments, and HR professionals",
author = "Jennifer Loh",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.4324/9780203798638",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781848729612",
pages = "255--270",
editor = "Lipinski, {John } and Crothers, {Laura M. }",
booktitle = "Bullying in the Workplace",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Loh, J 2014, The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior. in J Lipinski & LM Crothers (eds), Bullying in the Workplace: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies. Taylor & Francis, pp. 255-270. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203798638

The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior. / Loh, Jennifer.

Bullying in the Workplace: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies. ed. / John Lipinski; Laura M. Crothers. Taylor & Francis, 2014. p. 255-270.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior

AU - Loh, Jennifer

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Workplace bullying affects both organizations and individuals. At the individual level, workplace bullying affects the safety, welfare, and health of employees. Studies have found that targets (i.e. individuals who are bullied) reported higher levels of anxiety and depression (Namie, 2003) than did non-bullied workers. Individuals who are persistently bullied for an extended period of time also exhibited symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who are not bullied but are witnesses to such aggression reported higher levels of stress and lower work satisfaction than individuals who were not witnesses (Lutgen-Sandvik et al., 2007). At the organizational level, workplace bullying results in reduced productivity, low morale, high absenteeism, escalating staff turnover, and costly workers compensation claims or legal actions (Einarsen and Mikkelsen, 2003; McCarthy and Mayhew, 2004; Zapf and Einarsen, 2001; Zapf et al., 2003). Workplace bullying can also lead to adverse publicity for a company and/or affect the company’s public image (Bassman, 1992). As a consequence, workplace bullying is increasingly being recognized as an important workplace issue by researchers, managers, human resource (HR) departments, and HR professionals

AB - Workplace bullying affects both organizations and individuals. At the individual level, workplace bullying affects the safety, welfare, and health of employees. Studies have found that targets (i.e. individuals who are bullied) reported higher levels of anxiety and depression (Namie, 2003) than did non-bullied workers. Individuals who are persistently bullied for an extended period of time also exhibited symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals who are not bullied but are witnesses to such aggression reported higher levels of stress and lower work satisfaction than individuals who were not witnesses (Lutgen-Sandvik et al., 2007). At the organizational level, workplace bullying results in reduced productivity, low morale, high absenteeism, escalating staff turnover, and costly workers compensation claims or legal actions (Einarsen and Mikkelsen, 2003; McCarthy and Mayhew, 2004; Zapf and Einarsen, 2001; Zapf et al., 2003). Workplace bullying can also lead to adverse publicity for a company and/or affect the company’s public image (Bassman, 1992). As a consequence, workplace bullying is increasingly being recognized as an important workplace issue by researchers, managers, human resource (HR) departments, and HR professionals

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920500920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9780203798638

DO - 10.4324/9780203798638

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781848729612

SN - 9781848729629

SP - 255

EP - 270

BT - Bullying in the Workplace

A2 - Lipinski, John

A2 - Crothers, Laura M.

PB - Taylor & Francis

ER -

Loh J. The role of human resource departments in addressing bullying behavior. In Lipinski J, Crothers LM, editors, Bullying in the Workplace: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies. Taylor & Francis. 2014. p. 255-270 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203798638