The societal burden of haemophilia A. I – A snapshot of haemophilia A in Australia and beyond

Laurie Brown, Hai Anh La, Jinjing Li, Matthias Brunner, Martin Snoke, Annette M Kerr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
Few studies, both in Australia and overseas, have examined the social impacts of living with haemophilia A (HA) or the economic costs associated with the disorder. The purpose of this paper is to examine the epidemiology and societal burden of people with HA (PwHA) in Australia, with a particular focus on men with this disorder.

Methods
The epidemiology and societal burden of HA in Australia, with a particular focus on men with this disorder, were assessed, using data available in the Australian and international literature and publicly available data.

Results
The mean annual prevalence of HA is approximately 1‐2 per 10 000 males. Prophylactic treatment is used in one‐quarter (25.1%) of people with moderate HA, and 82.2% of people with severe HA. Within the latter group, 16.1% have inhibitors for Factor VIII, predisposing them to worse morbidity, mortality and quality of life when compared to the non‐inhibitor population. Joint pain and joint disease occur commonly in PwHA, with up to 70% of adults with HA experiencing joint problems. HA is associated with poor physical health, and PwHA miss school and work due to bleeding‐related events.

Conclusion
HA is associated with substantial economic burden; with large differences in costs reported between countries. Overall, HA imposes a significant burden of disease on PwHA, their families and the community at large.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-10
Number of pages8
JournalHaemophilia
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Sep 2020

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