The Victorian Curriculum F-10: A Critical Analysis of Implementation Opportunities in Civics & Citizenship and Economics & Business

Carly Sawatzki

Research output: Book/ReportReports

Abstract

This paper begins by introducing two recent school-leavers: Pete and Rosie.
Pete migrated to Australia with his parents five years ago. He has had enough of school and rural life. He’ll finish Year 10 just shy of his 17th birthday. Pete has known for some time that he wants to be a hair stylist for TV and film production – there is very little that he’s learned at school that he can see as being relevant to his career choice. He has applied for a Certificate II Pre-Apprenticeship course in Melbourne. He hopes to move to the city, board with his aunt in Brunswick, and get a job in an edgy salon. Once he starts work and can afford it, he wants to upgrade to an iPhone 6 with unlimited data. In the last six weeks, Rosie has completed Year 12, turned 18, got her driver’s licence, and secured a job waitressing at TGI Fridays. For now, while she saves for a car, she is
reliant on public transport and lifts from friends. It’s an exciting time, but she is feeling stressed about all the new responsibilities she has. Plus, she wonders whether her ATAR result will be enough to be accepted to her first preference University course. One of Rosie’s friends got a GP referral to see a psychologist to chat about these things. Rosie doesn’t want anyone to know she is feeling anxious. She has never been to the doctor without her mum and wonders if she will have to steal the family Medicare card to do so. Her older cousin works in a call-centre and tells her to get private health insurance – it’s important and you get stuff for free. Rosie is not really sure, but reckons her parents take care of this sort of thing.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherVictorian Commercial Teachers Association
Number of pages21
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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citizenship
curriculum
parents
school
film production
driver's license
private health insurance
economics
call center
apprenticeship
chat
public transport
psychologist
certification
career
responsibility
time

Cite this

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The Victorian Curriculum F-10: A Critical Analysis of Implementation Opportunities in Civics & Citizenship and Economics & Business. / Sawatzki, Carly.

Victorian Commercial Teachers Association, 2016. 21 p.

Research output: Book/ReportReports

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