Tit for tat: burnout as a mediator workplace incivility and instigated workplace incivility

Jennifer MI Loh, Natasha Loi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of burnout as a mediator in the relationship between workplace incivility (WI) and instigated WI.

Design/methodology/approach – A survey of 303 white collar employees from small- to medium-size industries in Australia was conducted. Self-reported measures were used to obtain data on WI, burnout, and instigated WI. Mediation analyses with bootstrap via PROCESS was used ascertain the proposed relationship.

Findings – Results indicated that WI was positively linked to instigated WI. Importantly, results indicated that burnout fully mediated the relationship between WI and instigated WI.

Research limitations/implications – The correlational and self-report nature of the study exclude inference about causality between variables and may be more prone to bias. However, despite these limitations, pre- and post-cautionary steps were taken to ensure that these biases were kept at bay as much as is possible.

Practical implications – The study highlights that burnout may be an important underlying mechanism responsible for target’s and perpetrator’s uncivil relationships toward each other. Management should be cognizant of possible burnout among employees who experienced WI and to take appropriate training as preventive measures for WI.

Originality/value – This study responded to the call for more empirical investigation of WI. This study also integrated conservation of resources and the spiral of incivility theories to develop a theoretical model which linked WI to instigated WI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-111
Number of pages12
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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