Toward a more uniform sampling of human genetic diversity

A survey of worldwide populations by high-density genotyping

Jinchuan Xing, W. Scott Watkins, Adam Shlien, Erin Walker, Chad D. Huff, David J. Witherspoon, Yuhua Zhang, Tatum S. Simonson, Robert B. Weiss, Joshua D. Schiffman, David Malkin, Scott R. Woodward, Lynn B. Jorde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-throughput genotyping data are useful for making inferences about human evolutionary history. However, the populations sampled to date are unevenly distributed, and some areas (e.g., South and Central Asia) have rarely been sampled in large-scale studies. To assess human genetic variation more evenly, we sampled 296 individuals from 13 worldwide populations that are not covered by previous studies. By combining these samples with a data set from our laboratory and the HapMap II samples, we assembled a final dataset of ~250,000 SNPs in 850 individuals from 40 populations. With more uniform sampling, the estimate of global genetic differentiation (FST) substantially decreases from ~16% with the HapMap II samples to ~11%. A panel of copy number variations typed in the same populations shows patterns of diversity similar to the SNP data, with highest diversity in African populations. This unique sample collection also permits new inferences about human evolutionary history. The comparison of haplotype variation among populations supports a single out-of-Africa migration event and suggests that the founding population of Eurasia may have been relatively large but isolated from Africans for a period of time. We also found a substantial affinity between populations from central Asia (Kyrgyzstani and Mongolian Buryat) and America, suggesting a central Asian contribution to New World founder populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-210
Number of pages12
JournalGenomics
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Genetics
Population Density
Population
Central Asia
HapMap Project
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
History
Surveys and Questionnaires
Emigration and Immigration
Haplotypes

Cite this

Xing, J., Watkins, W. S., Shlien, A., Walker, E., Huff, C. D., Witherspoon, D. J., ... Jorde, L. B. (2010). Toward a more uniform sampling of human genetic diversity: A survey of worldwide populations by high-density genotyping. Genomics, 96(4), 199-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygeno.2010.07.004
Xing, Jinchuan ; Watkins, W. Scott ; Shlien, Adam ; Walker, Erin ; Huff, Chad D. ; Witherspoon, David J. ; Zhang, Yuhua ; Simonson, Tatum S. ; Weiss, Robert B. ; Schiffman, Joshua D. ; Malkin, David ; Woodward, Scott R. ; Jorde, Lynn B. / Toward a more uniform sampling of human genetic diversity : A survey of worldwide populations by high-density genotyping. In: Genomics. 2010 ; Vol. 96, No. 4. pp. 199-210.
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Xing, J, Watkins, WS, Shlien, A, Walker, E, Huff, CD, Witherspoon, DJ, Zhang, Y, Simonson, TS, Weiss, RB, Schiffman, JD, Malkin, D, Woodward, SR & Jorde, LB 2010, 'Toward a more uniform sampling of human genetic diversity: A survey of worldwide populations by high-density genotyping', Genomics, vol. 96, no. 4, pp. 199-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygeno.2010.07.004

Toward a more uniform sampling of human genetic diversity : A survey of worldwide populations by high-density genotyping. / Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W. Scott; Shlien, Adam; Walker, Erin; Huff, Chad D.; Witherspoon, David J.; Zhang, Yuhua; Simonson, Tatum S.; Weiss, Robert B.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Malkin, David; Woodward, Scott R.; Jorde, Lynn B.

In: Genomics, Vol. 96, No. 4, 01.10.2010, p. 199-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Xing, Jinchuan

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AU - Weiss, Robert B.

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AU - Malkin, David

AU - Woodward, Scott R.

AU - Jorde, Lynn B.

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