Toward a Multi-Modal Brain-Body Assessment in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review in fNIRS

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) causes impairments in cortical structures leading to motor and cognitive symptoms. While common disease management and treatment strategies mainly depend on the subjective assessment of clinical scales and patients' diaries, research in recent years has focused on advances in automatic and objective tools to help with diagnosing PD and determining its severity. Due to the link between brain structure deficits and physical symptoms in PD, objective brain activity and body motion assessment of patients have been studied in the literature. This study aimed to explore the relationship between brain activity and body motion measures of people with PD to look at the feasibility of diagnosis or assessment of PD using these measures. In this study, we summarised the findings of 24 selected papers from the complete literature review using the Scopus database. Selected studies used both brain activity recording using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and motion assessment using sensors for people with PD in their experiments. Results include: 1) The most common study protocol is a combination of single tasks. 2) Prefrontal cortex is mostly studied region of interest in the literature. 3) Oxygenated haemoglobin (HbO 2 ) concentration is the predominant metric utilised in fNIRS, compared to deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb). 4) Motion assessment in people with PD is mostly done with inertial measurement units (IMUs) and electronic walkway. 5) The relationship between brain activity and body motion measures is an important factor that has been neglected in the literature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4840-4853
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023

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